Tag Archives: supplements

Nutrition, muscle mass and strength as we age

FoodFacts.com wanted to share this important information with our community regarding how nutrition can help us combat a natural aging process.

A new review from the International osteoporosis Foundation Nutrition Working group has identified nutritional factors that contribute to sarcopenia. Sarcopenia is the gradual loss of muscle mass that occurs naturally as people age. Sarcopenia leads to a higher risk of fractures and other industries as muscle strength plays a role in the aging population’s tendency to fall.

The review focused on protein, Vitamin D, Vitamin B and an acid-based diet.
Evidence was reviewed from worldwide studies on how protein, acid-base balance, Vitamin D and Vitamin B affect sarcopenia.

“The most obvious intervention against sarcopenia is exercise in the form of resistance training. However, adequate nutritional intake and an optimal dietary acid-base balance are also very important elements of any strategy to preserve muscle mass and strength during ageing,” said Professor Jean-Philippe Bonjour, co-author and Professor of Medicine at the Service of Bone Diseases, University of Geneva.

The review found that protein plays an important role in muscle health. It recommends an intake of between 1 and 1.2 g/kg of body weight per day for muscle and bone health in the elderly. In addition, it found that Vitamin D also plays an important role in the development and maintenance of muscle mass and function. The review recommends Vitamin D supplements for seniors as the optimal way to ensure proper levels are maintained.

It also found that excessive consumption of acid-producing foods like meat and whole grains with a low consumption of fruits and vegetables may have negative effects on musculoskeletal health. Higher consumption of fruits and vegetables which help to balance acid levels will be advantageous for both bones and muscles. In addition, the review suggests that Vitamin B12 can help to improve muscle strength and function.

Dr. Ambrish Mithal, co-author and Chair and Head of Endocrinology and Diabetes division at Medanta, New Delhi underlined the need for further research in the field.
“Strategies to reduce the numbers of falls and fractures within our aging populations must include measures to prevent sarcopenia. At present, the available evidence suggests that combining resistance training with optimal nutritional status has a synergistic effect in preventing and treating sarcopenia,” said Mithal.

“We hope that further studies will shed light on other effective ways of preventing and treating this condition,” he added.

FoodFacts.com hopes that our community takes this information to heart for themselves and their family members. Nutrition affects our health in so many ways. The small dietary adjustments that can be made to improve our lives are simple. If you consider vitamin supplementation for yourself or your family, you may want to consider these products from FoodFacts TRI Nutritionals: https://www.foodfactstri.com/shop-by-health-concern/shop-by-health-concern/bones-and-joints/vitamin-d-3-1000-iu and https://www.foodfactstri.com/shop-by-health-concern/energy/vitamin-b-12-500-mcg-100-count. Whatever your choices are, FoodFacts.com encourages everyone in our community to do your best to incorporate this important advice into your lifestyle.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/255169.php

Vitamin A deficiency may be linked to the treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C

FoodFacts.com and FoodFacts TRI Nutritionals came across some important information today regarding a link between Vitamin A deficiency and how it affects the treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C.

Researchers from a variety of different centers have conducted a study that suggests that those patients with Chronic Hepatitis C who also do not have high enough levels of Vitamin A are non-responsive to the treatments available for the disease.

Researchers focused on 199 patients with Chronic Hepatitis C. Prior to their treatment with antiviral therapy, the researchers compared the levels of Vitamin A and Vitamin D in these patients.

The Vitamin A levels were significantly lower for these HCV (Chronic Hepatitis C) patients than what is considered the norm. 42.2% of the patients exhibited extremely low levels of the vitamin. And 19.6% were considered to be severely deficient. 9% of the patients had severe deficiencies of both Vitamin A and Vitamin D.

The accepted treatment for HCV is antiviral therapy. The patients with severe Vitamin A deficiency were more likely to be non-responsive to treatment. 36% of patients with the deficiency did not respond as compared to 18.2% of those without the same level of deficiency.

In addition to these findings, a second set of findings illustrated that those patients with severely low levels of both Vitamin A and Vitamin D were at a higher risk of being non-responsive to the traditional therapy for their disease.

These vitamin deficiencies are considered to be strongly related to the ineffectiveness of antiviral therapy and suggest that Vitamin A levels can influence a patient’s outcome for Chronic Hepatitis C. Further research is planned to verify how supplementation of Vitamin A can restore the effectiveness of treatment in these patients.

FoodFacts.com understands the benefits of vitamin supplementation for its benefits to our general health, but we’re especially happy to see science stepping in and taking those benefits one step further. Certainly, if our vitamin intake can be directly associated to how we may respond to treatment for serious disease, we’re all one step closer to more effective treatments for our population. We’d like to make sure everyone in our community remains conscious of the benefits of vitamins and supplements and want to encourage everyone to be aware of their own consumption of both the foods and supplements that will assure them of their own good health. You might want to check out this product from FoodFacts TRI Nutritionals that can help you maintain the proper levels of both Vitamins A and D. http://www.foodfactstri.com/vitamin-a-10000-iu-vitamin-d-400-iu-100-count  — they are well formulated from high quality ingredients and contain no sugar, salt, dairy, yeast, wheat, gluten, corn, preservatives, artificial colors or flavors.

Whatever vitamin supplements you choose, FoodFacts.com wants to encourage our community to incorporate this important information into your dietary choices.

http://www.healio.com/hepatology/chronic-hepatitis/news/online/%7B96429919-42C5-489C-9BB5-C5A2E4774093%7D/Chronic-HCV-linked-to-vitamin-A-deficiency-nonresponse-to-antiviral-therapy

Can consuming processed meats increase your chances of developing thyroid cancer?

FoodFacts.com has always maintained the position that the consumption of processed meats is not the best choice to make while trying to maintain a healthy diet. We know that most in our community feel the same way and try to avoid processed meats as much as possible.

We recently read about some new research published in the International Journal of Cancer that links nitrites used in processed meats to a increased risk of cancer. The study comes out of the Department of Health Studies at the University of Chicago and focused on participants with higher and lower intakes of nitrites.

Over 73,000 females up to the age of 70 were followed through a food frequency questionnaire. They were followed for an 11 year period. During that follow-up period, 164 cases of thyroid cancer developed within this population. While there was no general association made between nitrate intake and risk for thyroid cancer in most of the studied population, that in the highest range of nitrite intake had a 100% increased risk of developing thyroid cancer when compared with those who had the lowest range of nitrite consumption. You read that right – a 100% increased risk!

While the study is suggesting a link, that link may be quite factual because nitrites can be converted into cancer causing N-nitroso compounds. These compounds have already been discovered to cause other types of cancers.

Nitrites are common ingredients in products such as hot dogs, processed deli meats, ham, bacon, sausage, and many boxed or canned products where preservatives are found. FoodFacts.com cannot stress the importance of reading ingredient labels strongly enough. There are times when a consumer picks up a product in which they would never expect to find nitrites and the ingredient is listed clearly on the product.

In addition to the possibility of picked up a processed food product where you wouldn’t expect to find nitrites as an ingredient, FoodFacts.com is also aware that there are many folks who do have a difficult time completely giving up foods like bacon and sausage. For these folks, the research suggests that taking a high dose of a Vitamin C supplement, or drinking a high Vitamin C fruit juice can help prevent the conversion of nitrites into N-nitroso compounds. The study also points out that while a juice product may be labeled as high in Vitamin C, it is a more reliable option to take Vitamin C supplements regularly because you can be sure of the content of the supplement more readily than that of the juice.

When looking for a healthy Vitamin C supplement, keep in mind that FoodFacts TRI Nutritionals offer you pure, natural, real ingredients that are free from most items you may be actively avoiding in your supplements, like sugar, salt, gluten and corn. FoodFacts.com would, of course as always, be an advocate of eliminating nitrites from your diet completely. It’s one of the best, healthiest decisions you can make for your body.

We invite you to read more about this fascinating study:  http://www.foodconsumer.org/newsite/Nutrition/Food/processed_meat_linked_to_thyroid_cancer_1222120314.html

Even a small deficiency of Vitamin B-12 may put your at risk for accelerated cognitive disease

Since launching FoodFacts TRI Nutritionals earlier this month, FoodFacts.com has been actively researching vitamins and supplements and their effects on our health and well being.

Today we found a recent study that suggests that older adults may be at greater risk for accelerated cognitive decline if they aren’t getting enough Vitamin B-12. The study comes out of the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University.

Researchers at the HNRCA at Tufts examined data from almost 550 men and women who were enrolled in a heart study. They focused on their scores of the Mini-Mental State Examination. This exam consists of a list of questions and tasks that are routinely used to diagnose dementia. The participants were split into five groups all based on the levels of Vitamin B-12 in their blood.

The two groups of participants who had the lowest levels of Vitamin B-12 had experienced significantly Being in the two lowest groups was associated with a significantly faster rate of cognitive decline. This was determined by following their test scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination over the course of eight years.

While a severely low level of Vitamin B-12 deficiency is related to cognitive impairment, this study suggests that there are adverse effects related to levels of deficiency that are not considered severe. Over time, those participants in the second lowest group of Vitamin B-12 levels had the same outcome as those in the very lowest group. This leads researchers to believe that even small deficiencies of this important vitamin are effecting a larger population.

The analysis discovered that the Mini-Mental State Examination scores dropped an average of .24 points per year for the first three groups of participants, while falling an average of .35 points yearly in the lowest two groups. This is a meaningful difference in cognitive decline.

The study raises a definite concern regarding the population’s intake of Vitamin B-12 and notes that it becomes more difficult to maintain normal blood levels of the vitamin as we age. Older adults seem to have a more difficult time absorbing Vitamin B-12 from food into the blood stream. It’s because of that that the USDA’s 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that people over 50 incorporate B-12 fortified foods or supplements into their diets.

FoodFacts.com is again happy to see that science is exploring the effects of natural solutions to health problems. If you’re over 50, you might want to consider this product from FoodFacts TRI Nutritionals for its quality ingredients and purity. However you decide to supplement, make sure you do. It’s a natural answer to a difficulty that would be best to avoid!

Read more: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121205102613.htm

Fish oil may not help to prevent depression afterall

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Many health articles have reported in recent months that fish oils, primarily omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, help to prevent depression in women. Before you go purchase a lifetime supply of fish oils, know that these research studies are constantly evolving. Though some may claim new dietary benefits one month, chances are those recommendations could change the next. Currently, researchers are still looking into the link between these fatty acids and depression. Also, they are continuing to look into fish oil consumption and diabetes in women. Make sure you conduct your own research or consult with a physician before initiating any supplementation.

Eating fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids doesn’t appear to stave off the blues in women, U.S. researchers have found.

Their study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, adds to the conflicting evidence on the benefits of fish oil, which some research has hinted might help certain people with depression.

“We know that omega-3s are important in brain function,” study researcher Dr. Alberto Ascherio, a nutrition expert at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, told Reuters Health.

“We approached this work thinking that when it comes to preventing depression, it’s conceivable that you are what you eat,” he said.

But the researchers’ findings didn’t bear out that prediction.

The team followed nearly 55,000 nurses over 10 years. All the women, between 50 and 77 years old, were free of depression when the study began in 1996.

Over the next decade, five percent of them eventually developed clinical depression. But the risk was the same regardless of how much DHA and EPA — two omega-3 fatty acids — women got from eating fish.
b12-salmon-lg1
Fish rich in omega-3s include salmon, trout, sardines and herring.

The researchers did find preliminary signs that a plant-based omega-3 called alpha-linolenic acid could play a role in mood.

For every increase of half a gram in daily intake of the substance –common in walnuts and canola oil, for instance — there was an 18-percent reduction in the risk of depression.

A study like the current one can’t prove cause-and-effect, and Ascherio said the area needs further research before any recommendations can be made.

His team also examined omega-6 fatty acids, but was unable to come up with conclusive findings on its impact on depression. Omega-6s are found in refined vegetable oils and are ubiquitous in snack foods, sweets and fast foods.

Depression strikes twice as many women as men, with one in five U.S. women experiencing the problem at some point.

Dr. Teodore Postolache, who directs the mood and anxiety program at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, told Reuters Health he is not yet ready to give up on fish oil.

“There are inherent limitations on studies about depression, including determining with certainty what exactly depression is for patients,” Postolache said.

Using data from nurses, for example, can skew results because nurses are more educated in matters of health and diet than the general population.

“If groups who may have underlying deficits in fish oil were studied, like lower socioeconomic groups, we might have seen a more powerful effect of the omega-3s in preventing depression,” he said.

He also noted that the study excluded women who had previous episodes of depression, although this group is one of “the most important targets for intervention because they are at high risk for a repeat episode.”

He called for more research on animals and in broader swaths of the population.

(Yahoo Health)

SOURCE: http://bit.ly/kmB4rn American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, April 2011.