Tag Archives: lung cancer

Soybeans discovered to have anti-cancer properties

FoodFacts.com is always a big fan of information pointing to foods as possible treatments for serious disease. Natural treatments for chronic, sometimes deadly conditions could help millions of people worldwide and save them from traditional, often painful and debilitating treatments that sometimes have limited results.

A recent study from University of Arkansas researchers points to the possibility that soybeans show potential as a treatment for cancer. It appears that proteins found in soybeans may have the ability to block the growth and development of lung, liver and colon cancer tumors. The peptides derived from soybean meal have shown to inhibit cancer cell growth.

Soybean meal is a bi-product from the oil extraction of soybean seeds. Proteins make up about 40 percent of the nutritional components of the seeds and can also contain high amounts of a monounsaturated omega-9 fatty acid.

The researchers looked at the role soybeans could have in the prevention of cancer. They used a variety of soybean lines which were high in oleic acid and protein and monitored the activity between the peptides derived from the soybean meal and various types of human cancer.

The study showed that peptides derived from soybean meal inhibited cell growth by 73% for colon cancer, 70% for liver cancer and 68% for lung cancer cells using human cell lines. This suggests that certain soybean lines could have a potential nutraceutical affect in helping to reduce the growth of several types of cancer cells.

FoodFacts.com will follow this information and keep our community informed of other research done to further these results. These exciting new findings raise hope that those afflicted with these cancers can someday receive treatments that are not only more natural and kind to the body, but also more effective in fighting their disease.

Read more: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130320095033.htm

Alcohol ‘a major cause of cancer’

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About one in 10 cancers in men and one in 33 in women in western European countries are caused by current and past alcohol consumption, according to a study released on Friday.

For some types of cancer, the rates are significantly higher, it said.

In 2008, for men, 44, 25 and 33 percent of upper digestive track, liver and colon cancers respectively were caused by alcohol in six of the countries examined, the study found.

The countries were Britain, Italy, Spain, Greece, Germany and Denmark.

The study also showed that half of these cancer cases occurred in men who drank more than a recommended daily limit of 24 grammes of alcohol, roughly two small glasses of wine or a pint of beer.

The cancer rates for women in the same countries, along with the Netherlands and France, was 18 percent for throat, mouth and stomach, 17 percent for liver, five percent for breast and four percent for colon cancer.

Four-fifths of these cases were due to daily consumption above recommended limits, set for women at half the level of men.

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has long maintained that there is a causal link between alcohol consumption and cancers, especially of the liver, colon, upper digestive tract and, for women, breast.

But few studies have tried to connect the dots across a large population between cancer rates and total alcohol consumption, or the proportion of the disease burden occurring in people who drink more than guidelines would allow.

“Our data show that many cancer cases could have been avoided if alcohol consumption is limited to two alcoholic drinks per day in men and one alcoholic drink per day in women,” said Madlen Schutze, an epidemiologist at the German Institute of Human Nutrition in Potsdam and lead author of the study.

The findings also suggest that the limits set by many national health authorities may not be stringent enough to avoid the disease, she said.

“Even more cancer cases would be prevented if people reduced their alcohol intake to below recommended guidelines or stopped drinking alcohol at all,” she said in a statement.

The results, published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ), are drawn from the so-called EPIC cancer survey of 363,000 men and women who have been tracked since the mid-1990s.

Other risk factors that might have also led to cancer — especially smoking and obesity — were taken into account, the researchers said.

Nearly 44 percent of men in Germany exceeded the 24-gramme daily limit, followed by Denmark (43.6 percent) and Britain (41.1 percent).

Among women, Germany still topped the list, with 43.5 percent of women there exceeding limit, with Denmark (41 percent) and Britain (37.7 percent) coming in second and third.

Article provided by Yahoo Health