Tag Archives: kraft

Kraft recalls Velveeta cheeses with thin wire pieces…

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – Northfield, IL., September 30 2011 – Kraft Foods Global, Inc. is voluntarily recalling three varieties of Velveeta Shells & Cheese Single Serve Microwaveable Cups with limited “best when used by” dates as a precaution due to the possible presence of small, thin wire bristle pieces.

The following products are being recalled:

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For exact product images click here.

Consumers can find the “best when used by” date on the bottom of the package.

No other “best when used by” dates of Velveeta Shells & Cheese Single Serve Microwaveable Cups or any other Kraft Foods products are being recalled.

There have been no reports of consumer injuries or complaints. Kraft Foods is issuing this voluntary recall out of an abundance of caution.

Approximately 137,000 cases of the affected products were shipped to customers across the United States. The affected products were not distributed in Canada.

Consumers who purchased affected “best when used by” dates of these products should not eat them. They should return them to the store of purchase for an exchange or full refund. Consumers also can contact Kraft Foods Consumer Relations Monday through Friday at 1-800-308-1841.

The affected products were manufactured in Champaign, IL and Lakeville, MN.

New Nutrition Standards! .. made by Major Food Companies???

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Today at Foodfacts.com, we have come across a recent event that we feel should be mentioned. We know many of our followers are taking a healthy initiative to better feed themselves and their families. However, sometimes this can be difficult because the amount of processed foods that plague many supermarkets. The majority of junk in stores is directly targeted at children, of course by major food corporations just looking to make profit. Take a look at what is currently going on.

Today the Council of Better Business Bureaus in Washington, DC announced that major food companies such as Kellogg’s, Nestle, Kraft, and ConAgra will be cutting down on marketing unhealthy products aimed at children. Products will now only be marketed if they meet a new set of nutritional standards. What they forgot to mention was that the government had recently proposed a strict set of standards that these food companies disapproved of and discarded, then they turned around and made their own. Is this really ethical? Can food companies with a reputation of marketing mostly junk in boxes really be allowed to come up with their own nutritional standards? And why just now? After years of increasing numbers of children with obesity and diabetes, do they just start initiating nutritional standards? Sounds sketchy.

Here is the new criteria list set by the “Sensible Food Policy Coalition” (which is now what the big food corporations now refer to themselves as):

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Juices. For juices, no added sugars are permitted, and the serving must contain no more than 160 calories.

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Dairy. This category includes products such as milk and yogurt. For ready to drink flavored milk, an 8 fluid ounce portion is limited to 24 grams (g) of total sugars. For yogurt products, a 6 ounce portion is limited to 170 calories and 23 grams of total sugars. These sugars criteria include both naturally-occurring and sugars added for flavoring.

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Grains, fruits and vegetable products (and items not in other categories). This category includes products such as cereals, crackers and cereal bars. Foods with ≤ 150 calories, such as most children’s breakfast cereals, must contain no more than 1.5 g of saturated fat, 290 milligrams (mg) of sodium and 10 g of sugar (products with > 150−200 calories get proportionately higher limits). Foods in this category also must provide ≥ ½ serving of foods to encourage (fruits, vegetables, non- or low-fat dairy, and whole grains) or ≥ 10% of the Daily Value of an essential nutrient.

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Seeds, nuts, nut butters and spreads. Foods in this category, which includes peanut butters, must have no more than 220 calories, 3.5 g of saturated fat, 240 mg of sodium and 4 g of sugar per 2 tablespoons. Foods in this category also must provide at least one ounce of protein equivalent.

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Main dishes and entrees. Foods in this category, such as canned pastas, must have no more than 350 calories, 10 percent calories from saturated fat, 600 mg of sodium and 15 g of sugar per serving. Foods in this category also must provide either ≥ 1 serving of foods to encourage or ≥ ½ serving of foods to encourage and ≥ 10% of the Daily Value of two essential nutrients.

What do you think about these new standards? Let us know!