Tag Archives: kellogg’s

New Nutrition Standards! .. made by Major Food Companies???

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Today at Foodfacts.com, we have come across a recent event that we feel should be mentioned. We know many of our followers are taking a healthy initiative to better feed themselves and their families. However, sometimes this can be difficult because the amount of processed foods that plague many supermarkets. The majority of junk in stores is directly targeted at children, of course by major food corporations just looking to make profit. Take a look at what is currently going on.

Today the Council of Better Business Bureaus in Washington, DC announced that major food companies such as Kellogg’s, Nestle, Kraft, and ConAgra will be cutting down on marketing unhealthy products aimed at children. Products will now only be marketed if they meet a new set of nutritional standards. What they forgot to mention was that the government had recently proposed a strict set of standards that these food companies disapproved of and discarded, then they turned around and made their own. Is this really ethical? Can food companies with a reputation of marketing mostly junk in boxes really be allowed to come up with their own nutritional standards? And why just now? After years of increasing numbers of children with obesity and diabetes, do they just start initiating nutritional standards? Sounds sketchy.

Here is the new criteria list set by the “Sensible Food Policy Coalition” (which is now what the big food corporations now refer to themselves as):

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Juices. For juices, no added sugars are permitted, and the serving must contain no more than 160 calories.

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Dairy. This category includes products such as milk and yogurt. For ready to drink flavored milk, an 8 fluid ounce portion is limited to 24 grams (g) of total sugars. For yogurt products, a 6 ounce portion is limited to 170 calories and 23 grams of total sugars. These sugars criteria include both naturally-occurring and sugars added for flavoring.

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Grains, fruits and vegetable products (and items not in other categories). This category includes products such as cereals, crackers and cereal bars. Foods with ≤ 150 calories, such as most children’s breakfast cereals, must contain no more than 1.5 g of saturated fat, 290 milligrams (mg) of sodium and 10 g of sugar (products with > 150−200 calories get proportionately higher limits). Foods in this category also must provide ≥ ½ serving of foods to encourage (fruits, vegetables, non- or low-fat dairy, and whole grains) or ≥ 10% of the Daily Value of an essential nutrient.

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Seeds, nuts, nut butters and spreads. Foods in this category, which includes peanut butters, must have no more than 220 calories, 3.5 g of saturated fat, 240 mg of sodium and 4 g of sugar per 2 tablespoons. Foods in this category also must provide at least one ounce of protein equivalent.

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Main dishes and entrees. Foods in this category, such as canned pastas, must have no more than 350 calories, 10 percent calories from saturated fat, 600 mg of sodium and 15 g of sugar per serving. Foods in this category also must provide either ≥ 1 serving of foods to encourage or ≥ ½ serving of foods to encourage and ≥ 10% of the Daily Value of two essential nutrients.

What do you think about these new standards? Let us know!

Another Across The Pond Comparison -Nutri-Grain Bars

Here’s another example of artificial food dyes being used in foods in America but not in the United Kingdom. Kellogg’s Nutri-Grain bars…check out the comparisons in the video!

Here’s the American version and here’s the United Kingdom’s version.

We like that in the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand they tell you the amount in percentages of real ingredients like strawberry.

Good thing the F.D.A. is starting to think about warning Americans about artificial colors.

Kellogg’s Pop Tarts in the USA vs. Kellogg’s Pop Tarts in the UK

Can you spot the differences??

We can! Amazing how the same company can make the same product in two different countries but one country, in this case the United Kingdom, requires stricter food standards so the product is much healthier than the product in the country without the strict food rules, in this case the United States of America.

Here is the United Kingdom Strawberry Pop Tart and here is the United States Strawberry Pop Tart.

Notice the differences in the food coloring. The American version allows for Yellow 6, Red 40 and Blue 1 but those controversial colors are banned in the United Kingdom so they use natural dyes. Yellow 6, Red 40 and Blue 1 are apart of a group of dyes that are known to cause ADHD, ADD and behavioral problems, check out your labels, you’ll be surprised how many products have those colors.

Froot Loops Healthier in Australia & New Zealand

Some American food manufactures make healthier versions of their products in other countries because those countries have stricter food policies. An example of this is Kellogg’s Froot Loops, here is the American version’s nutrition information and here is the Australian & New Zealand version’s nutrition information.

Watch here as we point out the differences:

It’s really amazing to us that the U.S.A. can allow these processed and sugar laden foods with controversial ingredients but it appears that other westernized countries eat a healthier version of the product. And we wonder how our childhood obesity rates are out of control?