Tag Archives: dairy

New evidence linking acne to diet

FoodFacts.com understands the problems acne causes for so many in our population. Most common in the teenage years, but reaching well into adulthood and middle age, so many people are affected by this condition which has negative consequences for self esteem and socialization.

A new study recently published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has shown evidence of a link between diet and acne, most specifically from high glycemic load diets and dairy products. In addition, it illustrates that nutrition therapy can play a major role in the treatment of acne.

Over 17 million people in the United States suffer from acne. It influences their quality of life and can be a cause of anxiety and depression. Since the 1800s, research linked diet to acne. Most especially, the consumption of chocolate, sugar and fats were associated with the skin condition. By the 1960s new studies began to separate diet from the condition. Recently, though, dermatologists and registered dieticians have begun to explore the relationship between diet and acne and have become interested in how medical nutritional therapy might change the treatment of acne.

The new study comes out of the New York Medical College and New York University’s Department of Nutrition, Food Studies and Public Health. The researchers conducted a literature review to look at evidence for the diet/acne relationship.

Using information from studies conducted between 1960 and 2012, they compiled data for various study characteristics that included design, participants, results and conclusions, to name a few. After this review, it was concluded that a high glycemic index diet as well as frequent dairy consumption are the strongest factors in the link between diet and acne. They were careful to note that the research reviewed did not illustrate that diet is a cause of acne, but that it may well influence or aggravate the condition.

The researchers are recommending that dermatologists and dieticians work together to design and conduct further research based on their findings. They are interested in discovering how these dietary findings are related to acne and want to learn how the development of dietary interventions may change the way acne is treated.

FoodFacts.com appreciates every possibility for the treatment of health concerns through diet. It’s always important to learn and understand how the foods we consume affect our health and how adjustments to our diet can lessen the need for powerful medications, leading to more natural solutions for many different conditions.

Read more here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/256658.php

The Deal on Food Allergies – How to Avoid Potential Reactions

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Brought to you by Foodfacts.com:

In the US alone, approximately 15 million people currently live with a food allergy. Of the 15 million, 6 million are children. Peanut allergies in children alone have tripled between 1997 and 2008; and more children are being diagnosed with life-threatening allergies. These numbers have been drastically increasing over recent decades for reasons which are poorly understood.
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There are eight major foods that account for approximately 90% of all food-allergy reactions in the U.S.: milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts (e.g., walnuts, almonds, cashews, pistachios, pecans), wheat, soy, fish, and shellfish. Even the smallest trace of these foods can trigger a reaction for someone with a food allergy. If you don’t understand the biological mechanism, we can help summarize it:

• All foods contain proteins. Proteins are normally the component that trigger an allergic reaction.
• Some proteins are resistant to digestion in the digestive tract.
• When these undigested proteins pass through the body, Immunoglobulin IgE (an allergy related antibody), targets the protein as harmful to alert the immune system of its presence.
• The immune system then triggers a reaction to help rid/destroy the protein, which can range from a mild to severe reaction.

Currently, there is no cure for food allergies. Most people with a food allergy must stick to a lifelong avoidance of food allergens. Also, they must learn the signs and symptoms of reactions before a potentially dangerous situation. Early recognition and management of allergic reactions to foods are critical steps that must be taken to avoid serious health-related complications.
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How to avoid potential reactions:

Read Food Labels. Carefully go through all ingredients on the nutrition panel to search for any signs of a potential food allergen. Under the Food Allergen Labeling and consumer Protection Act of 2004, it is required that all nutrition labels list specific sources of ingredients if derived from the major 8 food allergens.
Also, many products are manufactured in one common factory. Most labels will list information pertaining to possible cross-contamination for various foods.

Choose Restaurants Wisely. Many public food establishments cook with the major 8 food allergens on a daily basis. However, there are some restaurants that cater to those with food allergies. Do your research to find an eating spot you find safe. Read reviews, call managers, talk to friends; get the information on the establishment.

Prepare your own foods. Whether you’re going to school, attending a party, or holding a business meeting, bring your own foods. It’s reassuring to have control of the ingredients in the foods you eat. Also, don’t be embarrassed to provide your own snacks, because there are millions of people with food allergies that do the same thing! Many people are very understanding of these circumstances.

Heart-Healthy Seaweed

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Foodfacts.com likes to stay current with the latest research pertaining to foods and nutrition. We think our followers would be interested in this article surrounding research that shows seaweed has heart-healthy benefits. Check it out!

ScienceDaily (July 21, 2011) — In an article that may bring smiles to the faces of vegetarians who consume no dairy products and vegans, who consume no animal-based foods, scientists have identified seaweed as a rich new potential source of heart-healthy food ingredients. Seaweed and other “macroalgae” could rival milk products as sources of these so-called “bioactive peptides,” they conclude in an article in ACS’s Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Maria Hayes and colleagues Ciarán Fitzgerald, Eimear Gallagher and Deniz Tasdemir note increased interest in using bioactive peptides, now obtained mainly from milk products, as ingredients in so-called functional foods. Those foods not only provide nutrition, but have a medicine-like effect in treating or preventing certain diseases. Seaweeds are a rich but neglected alternative source, they state, noting that people in East Asian and other cultures have eaten seaweed for centuries: Nori in Japan, dulse in coastal Europe, and limu palahalaha in native Hawaiian cuisine.

Their review of almost 100 scientific studies concluded that that some seaweed proteins work just like the bioactive peptides in milk products to reduce blood pressure almost like the popular ACE inhibitor drugs. “The variety of macroalga species and the environments in which they are found and their ease of cultivation make macroalgae a relatively untapped source of new bioactive compounds, and more efforts are needed to fully exploit their potential for use and delivery to consumers in food products,” Hayes and her colleagues conclude.