Tag Archives: breakfast

What exactly is in the McDonald’s Deluxe Breakfast?

3-mcdonalds-deluxe-breakfast

Foodfacts.com realizes that millions of people start out their mornings reading from the breakfast menu at a local McDonald’s. Their daily options range from oatmeal to english muffins, to sausage and egg McMuffins, to pancakes, and more. However, some may have difficulties choosing exactly which item they want, and these may be the consumers that opt for the “deluxe” breakfast; a little bit of it all.
blog.foodfacts.com
Scrambled Eggs: They’re yellow, fluffy, warm, and even appealing to some. However, McDonald’s scrambled eggs may be the most disturbing item found on their large menu. Filled with controversial ingredients which includes sodium benzoate, artificial colors, and partially hydrogenated oils, these scrambled eggs are far from ideal to start off the day. Although eggs have been shown to increase HDL cholesterol (to reduce risk of cardiovascular disease), these eggs are loaded with trans fats from partially hydrogenated oils which promote the bad LDL cholesterol.
mcdonalds_sausage_mcgriddle
Sausage Patties: McDonald’s loves to include their famous breakfast sausage into many of their entrees. The good news, it actually contains pork; the bad news, it includes about 12 other things that could be harmful to your health. BHA and BHT are harmful additives, and The Department of Health and Human Services says BHA is “reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen.” Even though BHT has been found to be less harmful, some animal studies have shown it has been linked to cancers. Yet the FDA deems it as generally safe for consumption. These patties also contain monosodium glutamate (MSG), caramel color (which also has been linked to cancer), and corn syrup solids. Many would refer to these sausage patties as “cancer patties.”
20110131-biscuit300
Biscuit: Many normally prepare biscuits at home using a handful of ingredients. At McDonald’s biscuits are made with about 50 ingredients to preserve their freshness while sitting around in the restaurant during breakfast hours. Some of these ingredients include sodium aluminum phosphate, modified cellulose, partially hydrogenated oils, liquid margarine, sodium benzoate, and natural flavors. It’s a good sign that a food may not be a real food when you can’t pronounce or understand 99% of the ingredients.
mcdonalds-hash-browns
Hash browns: You can’t have a “deluxe” breakfast without some hash browns. In this case, it’s a thin potato patty which often leaves your fingers feeling slick with grease. They come in thin paper sleeves and don’t exactly taste like potatoes, but it says they are, so I guess it is then? While they do obviously contain potato, they’re also filled with preservatives, sodium, and fat which you can feel lining your arteries as you continue to digest. And lest we forget, these potato patties include TBHQ. Although deemed safe by the FDA, certain studies have shown that high doses of TBHQ are not only carcinogenic, but may also cause damage to DNA and promote growth of tumors.
img-thing
Hot Cakes: Or what we may commonly refer to as “pancakes,” McDonald’s hot cakes are the centerpiece of their deluxe meal. However, they’re not made by pan. In fact, they’re often microwaved at these restaurants after they receive large frozen shipments of these hot cakes from manufacturing centers. How they’re made, we’re not quite sure, but we do know what’s in them. High fructose corn syrup, artificial colors, TBHQ, and a load of preservatives grace the ingredients list, among other things. Of course we can’t forget, the fountain of syrup that comes along the side.

The damage of the deluxe meal:
nutrition-facts-panel1

Oatmeal now available at BK as a “healthier” option

burger-king-oatmeal
Foodfacts.com has reported on the trend of “healthier” options becoming marketed at major fast-food chains. McDonald’s, Chick-Fil-A, Starbucks, and Denny’s have all opted to add oatmeal to their menus in hopes of reaching a newer demographic of consumers. Burger King is now including oatmeal on their menu for just $1.99 in hopes of boosting revenue for the remainder of the year. Check out the article below to find out more on this new menu item!

Huffington PostOatmeal is the new burger.

Burger King, the world’s second-largest hamburger chain, added oatmeal to its breakfast menu this week, joining a slew of other chains that have brought the hot cereal out of the cupboard and into restaurants and drive-thrus.
Click logo for Burger King products at blog.foodfacts.com!
Burger King says it is trying to offer customers a healthier breakfast option beyond its sausage croissant sandwiches and French toast dipping sticks. It’s also an attempt by the struggling chain to catch up to competitors and boost sagging sales by appealing to customers beyond its base of burger-and-fries fans.

“We are definitely looking to broaden our target and our audience,” said Leo Leon, vice president of global innovation for Burger King Corp.

Breakfast is becoming the most important meal of the day for restaurants – accounting for nearly 60 percent of traffic growth between 2005 and 2010. And oatmeal is the latest battleground. It’s low-cost, easily prepared and doesn’t spoil quickly. It also appeals to people who want quick, affordable food they perceive as healthier than the typical fast-food breakfast fare.
fruit-and-maple-oatmeal
Starbucks Corp., the world’s biggest coffee chain, said its $2.49 oatmeal has become its most popular breakfast item since it launched in 2008. Last year, McDonald’s Corp., the world’s largest burger chain, added $2.99 oatmeal to its menu. Fast food chain Chick-fil-A and Denny’s casual dining restaurants also offer oatmeal, for $2.49 to 2.85 and 3.49 to 4.49, respectively. Burger King’s oatmeal, at $1.99, is the cheapest of the group.

Restaurants are trying to capitalize on oatmeal’s good-for-you reputation. But some industry experts say it’s not a good fit for fast-food chains.

McDonald’s has faced scrutiny for its oatmeal’s 4.5 grams of fat and 260 to 290 calories. That’s roughly equal to the number of calories in its own hamburger or cheeseburger. By comparison, Burger King’s oatmeal, which was created by Quaker Oats Co., has 110 to 270 calories and 1 to 4 grams of fat.

Still, Steve West, an analyst at Stifel Nicolaus, said: “People don’t go to Burger King or McDonald’s for their oatmeal … they go for an Egg McMuffin.”

For Burger King, oatmeal is part of a larger strategy. It’s critical for the chain to find a convenient new breakfast option. Burger King said 10 percent to 15 percent of its customers visit during breakfast. And the fast-food chain sells the majority of its food to go or at the drive-thru.

The company also is eager to replicate the success of McDonald’s, which has reinvented itself as a more hip and healthy place to eat, remodeling stores, offering wireless Internet service and introducing new salads, smoothies and coffee drinks. That’s brought in higher-income customers than the young males fast-food chains typically depend on – a demographic hit particularly hard by unemployment in the weak economy.

Burger King, based in Miami, has a lot of catching up to do. McDonald’s brought in more than $32 billion in U.S. sales last year, nearly four times Burger King’s $8.7 billion, according to research firm Technomic. That was a 4.4 percent increase for McDonald’s and a 2.5 percent decline for Burger King.

In the second quarter, Burger King’s profit fell 13 percent and its revenue fell 4 percent to $596.2 million, compared with a year earlier, due in large part to weakness in its North American operations. McDonald’s profit rose 15 percent and revenue grew 16 percent to $6.9 billion during its comparable period.

It’s going to take more than a hot meal to turn around Burger King’s business. Industry experts say the company has let its product lineup grow stale, and the quality of its stores has deteriorated.

“You can sell all the oatmeal and lattes and smoothies you want,” said West, the analyst. “But they’ve got to remodel the stores – for the most part Burger King stores are very old and rundown.”

Burger King, which has been reevaluating its business since it was acquired by investment firm 3G Capital last year, recently made other changes. The chain said Friday that it was retiring its mascot “The King” and launching a new campaign focused more on food. The company also added new salads and “Apple Fries” – apple slices cut to look like fries for its kids’ meals.

Cutting Calories with DietsInReview.com

Foodfacts.com has again partnered with DietsInReview.com to provide our followers with the latest health and nutrition information to sustain optimal health! Check out their tips below to cut calories at breakfast!

Cut Breakfast Calories at Restaurants Without Noticing

By Lacy J. Hansen for DietsInReview.com
dir-round
Try as we might, there’s no way around the science of calories. Each calorie counts and most of our favorite foods have far too many of them. No need to fret! Life doesn’t have to be lived eating flavorless celery and lettuce. There are many ways to reduce calories without feeling like you’re being deprived.

Here are 7 simple tricks you can use to cut calories from your breakfasts when dining out. You’ll consume fewer calories without sacrificing flavor.

1. Order a Guiltless Latte at Starbucks

Order a grande Americano with 2 pumps of sugar free vanilla syrup and add a splash of fat free milk and half a Splenda. It tastes exactly like a vanilla latte but with about 100 less calories, and a cheaper price tag.

2. Request Ice for Smoothies Instead of Milk

After all of the fruit, yogurt or protein powder is added, ask the smoothie maker to add ice to the blender instead of milk. The result is less calories and a very refreshing morning treat.

Make your own Blueberry Smoothie at home

3. Add more Veggies to Omelets

An omelet is already loaded with protein due to the eggs, so forget the high fat meats and cheese and load it with low-calorie, high-nutrient peppers, mushrooms, tomatoes, spinach, onions, and anything else you prefer. You’ll cut hundreds of calories and end up with a well balanced meal.

4. Flavor with Jam Instead of Butter

When topping toast, bagels, or English muffins, (whole wheat, of course) reach for the all fruit jam and forget the butter. Most jams are less than 50 calories per tablespoon- 50% less than butter. Ask servers not to butter your toasted sides.

5. Use Turkey Bacon Instead of Pork

Some slices of bacon can be over 100 calories per slice. Most people don’t stop at one slice either. Turkey Bacon can come in as low as 20 calories per slice. So be sure to ask your server is turkey options are available.

6. Use Egg Whites

One egg clocks in at about 70 calories. If you ditch the yolk, you cut over 50 of them. Granted, you’ll need more than one egg’s worth of whites for most dishes, you still get lots of protein and miss very little flavor in your morning scrambles or omelets.

7. Use Applesauce or Honey Instead of Maple Syrup

Still sweet and flavorful, applesauce on your pancakes or waffles will save you literally hundreds of calories as you start your day. 100 grams of applesauce equals 40 calories, while 100 grams of syrup equals a whopping 261 calories. You can also use much less honey than you would use in syrup and get more than enough sweetness.

Try more ways to cut calories with honey .

Breakfast on the Go

Inevitably, many of our Foodfacts.com followers frequently visit a drive-thru at a McDonald’s, Burger King, or any other fast food restaurant. Does this mean they’re bad people? No. Everyone is allowed to eat the foods that they choose. Plus, for some people it’s simply easier to stop by a fast-food window and pick up a quick meal. However, we would like to help in educating consumers to find the healthier options.

It seems that breakfast is the time of day that gets the least amount of attention by most. Many people skip breakfast all together. It’s normally those who frown upon this idea that resort to quick and accessible fast foods. Below are a few suggestions of items you could order and transform to healthier options.

mcdonalds-oatmeal1
Try this:
McDonald’s Fruit & Maple Oatmeal is 290 calories with 4.5g Fat, 160mg sodium, 32g sugar, and 57g of carbohydrate. Not exactly an ideal breakfast in most people’s eyes. However, the good news is you can order this oatmeal plain. Without the sugar, cream, and fruit blend you not only rid this product of most the controversial ingredients, but you also take away a hefty portion of the sugar. Instead, try adding a few nuts from home and cinnamon for taste.

Instead of this:
McDonald’s Sausage Burrito is about 300 calories, which some may choose as an appropriate calorie level for their first meal of the day. What you may not know is that this “burrito” contains about a dozen controversial ingredients. Among them are monosodium glutamate, BHA, hydrogenated cottonseed oil, and more. The scrambled eggs alone in this product should divert your attention from ordering this morning item. McDonald’s scrambled eggs are known for being quite unhealthy, so try checking the nutrition facts before choosing your first meal of the day.

Try this:
The Chick-Fil-A Yogurt Parfait contains 3g fat, 10mg cholesterol, 60mg sodium, and 35g of sugar. Although the sugar is a bit high, you could order this item without the added berries, which are probably contained in a sugar mixture to add sweetness. This yogurt parfait is also 6g of protein. By adding a few nuts and fresh granola, you could boost the protein and also add healthy fats. However, only add about a handful because nuts are higher in calories.
yogurt-parfait3

Instead of this:
The Chick-Fil-A breakfast chicken biscuit is 440 calories of saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium. About half a day’s worth of sodium is in this “morning” sandwich. Although this chicken sandwich has only a handful of controversial ingredients, compared to those with near a hundred, it may be too much sodium and fat to handle in the morning. This is the type of sandwich that will literally have you feeling gross after indulging.

Try this:
Burger King’s side salad without dressing can be a good breakfast if you have some creativity. Without the fattening dressings, these salads are good bases to add your favorite fruits like cranberries, and blueberries, and throw in some healthy nuts like walnuts and almonds. This will add the calories you need in the morning, and healthy fats to help give you energy. Also, if this isn’t filling enough, you could try the apple fries, but without the caramel sauce. There is no need for dessert toppings and high fructose corn syrup, especially in the morning.
salad11

Instead of this:
Burger King Double Ham and Sausage Croissanwich’ is approximately 570 calories. Included in this mountainous sandwich are two layers of scrambled egg “patties”, 2 slices of processed cheese, slices of ham, and a sausage patty. If this still sounds appetizing to you, think about the sodium, cholesterol, and fat that will negatively affect your health. About 68% the daily value of sodium, 80% the daily value of cholesterol, and 70% the daily value for saturated fat should be numbers that immediately make you switch to other options. The option to make this sandwich slightly healthier would be two remove everything, and keep the croissant, but you’re still paying 6 bucks for it.

Here is a video recently posted on ABC News that emphasizes how to order healthy options at fast food restaurants.

Cereal may help ward off hypertension

cereal

Starting each day with a bowl of cereal — especially a whole-grain variety — could trim up to 20% off your risk of developing high blood pressure, according to preliminary research presented Tuesday at an American Heart Association meeting in Atlanta.

High blood pressure, or hypertension, can be caused or worsened by a range of factors, including obesity, lack of exercise, too much sodium, and stress. Although cereal alone won’t keep blood pressure in check, eating it regularly may be an easy and practical way to prevent hypertension, the researchers say.

“Cereal is something that people can easily get into their diet and that they enjoy,” says lead researcher Jinesh Kochar, M.D., a geriatric specialist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, in Boston. “And it costs a lot less than the drugs you’d have to take if you had hypertension.”

Cereals made from whole grains appear to protect against hypertension slightly more than those made from refined grains (which have had their fiber- and nutrient-rich parts removed), the study found.

Julie Miller Jones, Ph.D., a professor of nutrition at the College of St. Catherine, in Minneapolis, says that cereal may be a better source of whole grain than bread and other foods because of how it tends to be served. “Usually with cereal you don’t add a source of saturated fat, while you might add something like sausage to bread,” says Jones, who points out that the study did not control for saturated-fat intake. Jones was not involved in the new research.

In addition, the nuts, raisins, or fruit often added to cereal contain fiber and potassium, both of which can help lower blood pressure. Milk’s effects on blood pressure can’t be discounted either, Jones says. “It may be more about the way you put the breakfast together than anything magical about breakfast cereal.”

7 breakfasts under 300 calories
Kochar and his colleagues analyzed data on more than 13,000 men who were part of the long-running Physicians’ Health Study, which is funded by the National Institutes of Health. All the participants had normal blood pressure and averaged 52 years old at the start of the study. Over the next 17 years, more than half developed hypertension.

Compared with men who never ate cereal, those who averaged one serving per week had a 7% lower risk of hypertension. Those who consumed cereal more frequently had even greater reductions in risk: Two to six weekly servings were associated with an 11% lower risk, and one or more servings per day were associated with a 19% lower risk. (To pinpoint the effect of the cereal, the researchers took several other risk factors for hypertension into account, including age, smoking history, fruit and vegetable consumption, and physical activity.)

Although the food questionnaires used in the study did not ask about specific brands of cereals, popular brand-name cereals made from refined grains include varieties of Corn Flakes, Special K, and Rice Krispies, while examples of whole-grain cereals include Cheerios, shredded wheat, and bran.

10 heart-healthy rules to live by

More research will be needed to determine whether cereal is associated with a lower risk of hypertension in women, too, Kochar says. Although previous studies have shown that women derive heart benefits from whole grain, the findings can’t be immediately generalized beyond men.

Roughly 1 in 3 adults in the U.S. has hypertension, which is a major risk factor for heart attacks, strokes, and kidney problems. The AHA estimates that hypertension costs the country an estimated $90 billion in health-care and other costs each year.

Kochar presented his findings at the AHA’s annual conference on nutrition, physical activity, and metabolism. Unlike the studies published in medical journals, the research presented at the meeting has not been thoroughly vetted by other experts.

Information provided by: health.com

Happy Mardi Gras!

Get the beads out, It’s Fat Tuesday! Although, Foodfacts.com cautions against unhealthy foods, it is ok to indulge every once in awhile. Here’s a video on some of the classic Mardi Gras foods and traditions.

So go ahead, whip up some pancakes or a King Cake! Our friends at Diary of A Sweet Tooth have a great recipe for King Cake, check it out!

Happy Mardi Gras!

McDonald’s Oatmeal

Our previous blog tells how to make Oatmeal the right way, this blog shows how McDonald’s is making Oatmeal the wrong way.

Oatmeal should be made with primarily one ingredient, not twenty one! Sure, at home you can add a little brown sugar, cinnamon, nuts, apples or milk, but you are doing so sparingly and with ingredients that are fresh without chemicals (McDonald’s “cream” has seven ingredients??)

I’m sure McDonald’s knows that once you walk into a McDonald’s you aren’t going to order just Oatmeal, they are just trying to get you in the door.

Has anyone tried the McDonald’s Oatmeal?

Healthy Oatmeal Recipe

Here is a healthy way to make Oatmeal, a very nutritious breakfast, from our friends at The Picky Eater. Tomorrow we will be talking about McDonald’s Oatmeal so take note of the nutrition differences:
img_20101108_153919

The Perfect Bowl of Oatmeal :)
I can sometimes be a creature of habit. When I was growing up, I pretty much had the same things for breakfast and lunch for like 15 YEARS. How crazy is that? It was always oatmeal in the morning and some sort of sandwich for lunch (usually PB&J!).

These days, I do like to mix it up a bit more – but I still LOVE my oatmeal And honestly, I think sometimes oatmeal gets a bad rap for being boring, or tasting bland or whatever – but the key is to just dress it up with your favorite fruits, nuts, granola, milk, etc – and it ends up being an amazing and wholesome meal! So here’s my take on the PERFECT bowl of oatmeal!

So first, of course – you need the Oats… There are tons of options out there for Oatmeal – there’s the instant kind, the Quaker (e.g. filled with sugar) kind, there’s the slow cooking kind, the multi-grain kind, etc. I really like to get the whole grain / multi-grain variety that has oats, wheat, rye and barley with no sugar added.

I just love the way it looks in the bowl Oatmeal is a nutritional powerhouse – with tons of soluble fiber & antioxidants. This variety is super hearty, filling, has only 130 calories per serving and 5g of fiber & protein each!

This version is also really easy to make – you just add 1 cup of water to 1/2 cup of oatmeal, microwave it for about 3-4 min and it turns out like this!

I just love how the oats get all fluffy and warm once they’re cooked! Now for the mix-ins – here are some of my favorites. First up – Blueberries!

Frozen blueberries are great because 1) They’re fresh year-round 2) They become all melty and warm in the oatmeal and 3) They never go bad! You can see them already defrosting just minutes after I put them on the oatmeal…

With a wonderful sweetness, antioxidants and fiber – you really can’t go wrong with this superfood! Once the blueberries are mixed in, I love adding in walnuts (another super food with omega 3s!)

Now – oatmeal has to be creamy and flavorful, and slightly sweet. The final three mix-ins are: Honey (yum!), Almond Milk (I like unsweetened almond breeze – see pic below), and Cinnamon (this adds a wonderful nutty flavor and goes soo well with the honey!)

Stir it all together, and your perfect bowl of oatmeal is complete! When it’s all done, it adds up to about 250-300 calories – the perfect breakfast!

Tada! We are ready to eat! I love how the oatmeal turns a bluish color as the blueberries melt into it I totally had this for breakfast today.. and yesterday… and the day before … haha – looks like I’m still a creature of habit! What does your perfect bowl of oatmeal look like? I’d love to hear from you!

Have A Merry Breakfast

Have A Merry Brekfast | Foodfacts.com

Have A Merry Breakfast | Foodfacts.com

Foodfacts.com members and Blog readers probably know that it’s easy to overlook this important meal when the pressure is on to get the turkey in the oven. But breakfast can help give us all a good start to the day, so when you and your family delve into your presents, remember to get into a good breakfast too. Continue reading