Tag Archives: bisphenol A

BPA …it’s even bad for babies before they’re born

FoodFacts.com has been examining a lot of new information on BPA. Bisphenol A has been banned for use in baby bottles and sippy cups here in the U.S., but still remains (unless removed voluntarily) in canned products and other plastics. Regardless of the amount of information being uncovered regarding the negative health impacts of BPA, our country has continued to allow its use in a variety of products.

Today we found more research from the Netherlands that has discovered that the chemical may impact the health of newborn babies.

The study involved the collection of urine samples from pregnant mothers at different stages of their pregnancies. They compared the BPA levels in those samples to their babies growth rate in the womb as well as their developing head circumferences. We know that a small head circumference can imply that a baby’s brain isn’t developing as quickly as it should. A slow rate of growth can lead to a low-birth-weight baby and low-birth-weight babies are more likely to develop delays than those born at a normal weight.

All the women involved in the study had relatively common levels of BPA. However, it was noted that the women showing the highest BPA levels were carrying babies that grew about 20 percent slower in utero than the women who had the lowest levels. The head circumferences of the babies whose mothers showed the highest levels of exposure were also about 11 percent smaller.

BPA is a known endocrine disruptor. It acts like estrogen in the body. It’s been linked to asthma as well as the impairment of neurological development in children. Because its use is so widespread, most people have constant low levels of the chemical in their bodies. Complete avoidance is almost impossible to achieve.

It’s true that the FDA has banned BPA from baby bottles and toddler cups, but this study shows that, in fact, those bans are not protecting our children at all. BPA can actually cause damage to babies while they are still in the womb. And because it’s so difficult to avoid the chemical, babies are really at risk.

While we can’t rid our country of BPA, we can certainly reduce our exposure by eliminating those things we have some control over. FoodFacts.com encourages everyone in our community and those in their networks to purchase canned foods carefully. Manufacturers who have voluntarily eliminated BPA from their canned products are usually very forthcoming about it on their websites and in the news. And when you’re storing beverages or foods, find containers that do not contain the chemical. While we may not be able to avoid BPA completely, we can make enough changes in our households to make sure that we keep levels as low as possible to minimize the dangers we learn more about every day.

Read more here: http://www.rodale.com/bpa-and-pregnancy

BPA in Children’s Foods

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A major concern among many of our Foodfacts.com followers is bisphenol A , better known as BPA. We’ll try to clear up any questions you may have regarding products containing BPA, and also give you tips and resources on how to avoid exposure.

First, what is BPA?
Bisphenol A is a chemical which is produced and used in large quantities for polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins which are commonly found in cans for food and jar lids.

Why is BPA a concern?
BPA is an endocrine disruptor. Exposure has been linked to a higher risk of prostate and breast cancers, infertility in females, diabetes, obesity, and ADHD.

Where can I find BPA?
A recent report issued by the Breast Cancer Fund showed various levels of BPA in different canned-foods marketed towards children. Note that these products may not be the only items containing BPA. BPA is measured in parts per billion (ppb):

114 ppb – Campbell’s Disney Princess Cool Shapes, Shaped Pasta with Chicken in Chicken Broth
81 ppb – Campbell’s Toy Story Fun Shapes, Shaped Pasta with Chicken in Chicken Broth
39 ppb – Earth’s Best Organic Elmo Noodlemania Soup, USDA Organic
31 ppb – Annie’s Homegrown Cheesy Ravioli, USDA Organic
13 ppb – Campbell’s Spaghettios with Meatballs
20 ppb – Chef Boyardee Whole Grain Pasta, Mini ABC’s & 123′s with Meatballs

Now that you know some of the foods which are exposed to BPA, you can also learn some foods that do not contain this chemical. The easiest way to find out, is to go online and do some research.

We’ve found that Eden Organic, Wild Planet, Trader Joe’s, Eco Fish, Edward & Son’s products do not use this chemical in their packaging. Also, Rubbermaid, Evenflo, and a few other plastic-based companies address that their items are available without BPA. Don’t be surprised if these items are a bit more pricey, because they tend to materials that cost more for each product.

Do your research on BPA!

(Foodfacts.com)