Category Archives: vinegar

Balsamic, Apple Cider, Sherry Wine: New report offers insight into the many different health benefits of many different vinegars.

Health Benefits of Different VinegarsDo you enjoy a variety of different varieties of vinegar in salad dressings? Maybe you experiment with different vinegars in your cooking. There are so many different options: traditional balsamic, white balsamic, apple cider, sherry wine, red wine. They all add different flavors to everything from salad dressings to sauces. Did you ever consider that you might be doing more than adding flavor to your food when using different vinegars?

A report published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) in the Journal of Food Science shows that certain types of vinegar could actually offer significant health benefits.

According to the studies cited in the article, vinegar is rich in antioxidants, which could reduce accelerated aging and even slow the development of certain cancers or degenerative brain disorders. The authors of the report also point to vinegar’s antibacterial properties, its ability to reduce the effects of diabetes, and its contribution to improved cardiovascular health and blood pressure. Vinegar is also said to help athletes recuperate after intense physical effort.

Finally, the report notes that individuals who consume certain types of vinegar on a daily basis have been shown to have lower appetites: a finding that could be applied when developing weight loss plans for obese patients.
The authors at the IFT nonetheless indicated that further research will be necessary to validate any claims regarding vinegar’s health benefits.

We have to admit that some of us here at FoodFacts.com have heard what we assumed to be old wives tales regarding the use of apple cider vinegar as a weight loss aid. We’ve also heard that it’s a great replacement for over-the-counter sinus medication. Then there are some claims about balsamic vinegar and its ability to lower blood pressure and stabilize cholesterol levels. We’re pretty sure you’ve heard some similar claims about these as well as other vinegar varieties. We plan on finding new and interesting ways to incorporate vinegars into our meal preparations. This is a great idea not only to bring new and interesting tastes into our dishes, but also to add a new dimension to the health benefits we may receive from our foods!

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2014/05/26/vinegar-benefits_n_5392828.html

Anti-freeze contaminated vinegar causes 11 deaths in China

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Foodfacts.com wants to provide our followers with the latest news surrounding foods and nutrition. Recently, 120 illnesses and 11 deaths were reported in China due to anti-freeze contaminated vinegar. Food safety is a prime concern for the world’s food supply and urges our readers to read the article below.

BEIJING — Vinegar tainted with antifreeze is suspected of killing 11 people and sickening 120 after a communal Ramadan meal in China’s far western region of Xinjiang.

Investigators suspect the victims consumed vinegar that was put in two plastic barrels that had previously been used to store toxic antifreeze, the official Xinhua News Agency reported Monday.

It said the mass food poisoning occurred Saturday night in a village close to Hotan city in Xinjiang, a border region that abuts Afghanistan, Pakistan and Central Asia. The victims were Muslims who were sharing an evening meal after the daily fast observed during the holy month of Ramadan.

Xinhua said children as young as 6 were among the dead. One person among the 120 sickened was still in critical condition.

Authorities were still testing to confirm the source of the poisoning, it said.

China’s food safety record has been battered by the rampant use of illegal or substandard additives by unscrupulous food producers. Milk powder laced with the industrial chemical melamine killed at least six children and sickened 300,000 in 2008. Producers added the nitrogen-rich melamine powder so their milk would seem higher in protein.

Revenge attacks using rat poison or other chemicals are also common in China, where access to firearms and other deadly weapons is tightly controlled.

In April, three children died and 35 others were sickened by milk tainted with nitrite. An investigation showed that a local dairy farmer had put the poison into their competitor’s milk supply.

But accidental contamination is also a problem, caused by low hygiene standards, particularly in rural areas, and weak quality control by regulators.

(Huffington Post)