Category Archives: vegetables

Eat your colors and reduce your risk of breast cancer

Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food. has always felt that Hippocrates had the right idea! We’re always thrilled to learn about how the foods we consume can have a positive influence on our health and well being. And we’re especially excited to discover that simple additions of fresh, healthy food to our diet can help us avoid chronic and often fatal illness.

A recent study from the researchers at Brigham & Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School has shown that women with high levels of carotenoids (naturally occurring plant chemicals) have a significantly lower risk of breast cancer.

While we know that diets high in fruits and vegetables have a positive influence on the risk of many different cancers, this particular link to those that are high in carotenoids offer specific benefits for women.

We’ve often heard the advice that “It’s best to eat in color”. This is certainly the case here. Carotenoids are pigements that give vegetables and fruits deep yellow, orange and red hues. Carrots, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, winter squash, apricots, mangoes and papyas are all great examples of foods high in carotenoids.

The researchers conducted a meta-analysis of data from 8 different studies that included 7,000 women. They discovered that the women whose blood levels were in the top 20 percent for carotenoids were 15 to 20 percent less likely to develop breast cancer than those women whose carotenoid levels were in the bottom 20 percent. Most impressive, thought, was that the link between higher carotenoid levels in the blood was the strongest for the most aggressive, lethal forms of breast cancer.

Researchers noted that it seemed to be a linear relationship. The higher the levels of caretonoids in the blood, the lower the risk of breast cancer.

While more research is needed to discover the specific reason for the link, researchers hypothesize that the body may metabolize carotenoids into retinol, which may inhibit tumor growth.

It was noted in the study that the most effective way to boost carotenoid levels in the blood is through food consumption, not supplementation. They clearly felt that increasing fruit and vegetable intake is the best way to receive the health benefits of carotenoids and perhaps decrease the risk of breast cancer.

There are so many wonderful fruits and vegetables in beautiful colors. honestly has a difficult time deciding which ones to include in our diets first. Whichever you choose, enjoy them in good health, knowing that the rich bounty of colorful, carotenoid-containing produce may help us decrease our odds of developing a deadly disease.

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Increasing fiber intake may lower first-time stroke risk evaluates every aspect of the food products in our database. Fiber is an aspect that we note on the Report Card for each one. It’s been well-known that fiber intake is an important part of a healthy diet for many reasons. Consumers are attracted to products that are higher in fiber for weight and appetite control But we’ve also known that dietary fiber can help reduce risk factors for stroke and can influence blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

Today we found new research that indicates that eating more fiber can decrease the risk of an initial stroke. Dietary fiber is the part of the plant that the body doesn’t absorb during digestion. Fiber can be soluble, which means it dissolves in water, or insoluble.
This new study found that each seven-gram increase in total daily fiber intake was associated with a 7 percent decrease in first-time stroke risk. Researchers noted that this seven-gram increase could be satisfied easily with one serving of whole wheat pasta and two servings of fruits or vegetables. This is especially important for those with pre-existing stroke risk factors like being overweight, having high blood pressure or smoking.
The research analyzed eight previous studies conducted between 1990 and 2012. These studies focused on different types of stroke, with four of them specifically focused on ischemic stroke (occurring when a clot blocks a blood vessel to the brain). Three of them were focused on hemorrhagic stroke (occurring when a blood vessel bleeds into the brain or on its surface). Findings from all the studies were combined and other stroke risk factors were considered.

The American Heart Association recommends a daily fiber intake of at least 25 grams daily. That can be achieved through six to eight servings of grains and eight to ten servings of fruits and vegetables. Most Americans do not consume the recommended level.
Stoke is the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S. It accounts for over 137,000 deaths annually and is the leading cause of disability for stroke survivors. wants to remind our community of the importance of our daily fiber intake. It’s not that difficult to achieve increased fiber consumption. This study indicates that by increasing our daily fiber we can decrease our risk of ever experiencing a stroke, prolonging our life and living healthier.

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Reduce your stroke risk … include more tomatoes in your diet just found another great reason to include more tomatoes in your diet. You could lower your risk of having a stroke!

Recent research released from the University of Eastern Finland have found a link between lycopene in tomatoes and stroke prevention. This latest finding illustrates just one more benefit from tomato consumption. Last year, the National Center for Food Safety & Technology found that tomatoes may provide protection from cancer, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. Seems like that juice, round, red globe packs a powerful health punch!

1,031 Finnish men participated in the study. They were between 46 and 65 years old and were followed for 12 years. They were all tested to determine their blood concentrations of lycopene when the study began. Significantly, the research showed that those men who had the highest levels of lycopene in their blood at the end of the 12 year period were at a 55% lower risk of stroke.

They compared the instance of stroke in the group of men with the lowest lycopene levels (258 in total) with the men with the highest concentrations of lycopene (259 in total). Of those with the lowest level, 25 experienced a stroke and of those with the highest concentrations, only 11 suffered from stroke.

When researchers isolated the instances of ischemic strokes which are caused by blood clots the connection to lycopene was even stronger. Those who had the highest levels of lycopene had a 59% lower risk. recently posted a blog with information that recommended people increase their daily servings of fruits and vegetables and this research certainly seems to corroborate those thoughts. Lycopene isn’t just found in tomatoes. Fruits like watermelon, papaya and apricots are also sources of lycopene. We keep learning more about this powerful antioxidant and everything we learn points to tremendous benefits for the population.

So maybe you’re a fan of tomato based salads, or perhaps you enjoy homemade tomato sauce, or maybe roasted tomatoes are especially appealing to you – there are so many ways to include tomatoes in your diet. For, tomatoes get high points for versatility, flavor, texture and color. Experiment a little and you’ll find new and exciting ways, not only to get more lycopene in your diet, but also increase your daily fruit and vegetable servings in some flavorful new creations!

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7 a day is better than 5 to keep you healthy AND happy! has reviewed research in the past that linked the consumption of junk food to a decline in the human ability to be optimistic and happy. It has been suggested that poor eating habits can actually add to depression and depressed moods. Today, however, we came across new research that links and increase in positive mental health and happiness to eating vegetables and fruits. We love the idea that our boosting our mental well being could be as simple as increasing our consumption of the foods that we already know are healthiest for our physical well being!

The University of Warwick in Great Britain conducted a study focusing on the diets of 80,000 people. They discovered that mental well being increased along with the number of servings of fruits and vegetables people consumed on a daily basis. Mental well being rose the most among those consuming seven servings each day.

While the current recommendations are to consume five servings of fruits and vegetables each day because we understand that this level of consumption protects our cardiovascular health and reduces our cancer risk, we’ve never looked at the effect of those servings – or an increase in those servings for our mental well-being.

The study focused on British citizens. It appears that currently 25% of the English population is eating one serving or no servings of fruits and vegetables each day. Only 10% are consuming seven or more. While the research doesn’t tell us that there are specific fruits and vegetables that are aiding in the mental health boost from those seven servings, they have, in fact, set a serving size that matters. One serving equals one cup. So, for instance one medium apple is one serving of fruit and two medium carrots will qualify as one serving of vegetables.

The authors of the study were somewhat surprised by their findings, mainly because mental health and well-being have not been related to diet in the past. For the most part treatment for mental health related difficulties has always been addressed medically, not nutritionally.

While we understand that nine servings per day can sound fairly daunting for many people, we know that there are some things you can do that can help increase your intake of fruits and vegetables. Here are a few ideas from your friends at

Fruit Salad for Dessert
If your family only indulges in desserts on the weekends, you might want to reconsider that schedule. On weeknights, prepare a fresh fruit salad and not only will you be treating your family to dessert, you’ll also be getting an extra serving of fruit into their diets.

Especially with the colder weather coming, hot cereal brings the opportunity to get more fruit into your diet. We know that prepared flavored oatmeal isn’t always made with the best ingredients. But if you add apple slices and cinnamon to a bowl of homemade oatmeal, it will be tastier than the box products and provide extra fruit for the day.

Extra Dinner Veggies
We’ve always liked the idea of getting some vegetables into an entree that may or may not be noticeable. For instance, sliced zucchini works well in lasagna and chopped spinach can easily be mixed inside a burger. A few others might include broccoli in a side of macaroni and cheese, or cabbage in mashed potatoes. You would, of course, be serving a vegetable alongside that entree, effectively adding to vegetable consumption.

Side Salads
So you have your protein, your vegetable and (perhaps) your starch picked out for your evening meal. Serve a salad with it. Salads can be prepared in interesting manners with fruit and vegetable additions that are very appealing and add new textures and flavors AND extra fruits and vegetables to your dinner! encourages you to read more about this new research (and to try some of our ideas as well):

Another great reason to go organic: pesticides in our produce

Earlier this summer, The Environmental Working Group released the eighth edition of its Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce. This is a great resource for consumers and wants to make our community aware of its findings.

Researchers different fruits and vegetables to determine pesticide contamination. This year’s study provides information on 45 different fruits and vegetables. All the samples of these fruits and vegetables were either washed or peeled prior to testing. In this manner the study actually reflects the amount of pesticides present when the food is actually being consumed. The results are pretty sad and kind of frightening.

An apple a day, for instance might actually end up sending you to the doctor, instead of keeping the doctor away. 98% of non-organic apples tested contained detectable levels of pesticides. Lettuce samples reflected the presence of 78 different pesticides. All the nectarines tested contained pesticide residue. Grapes “won” in the fruit category, with 64 different pesticides found in samples tested. Strawberries and blueberries were both on the list as well.

Most disturbing, however, was pesticide testing for fruit and vegetable baby food. This year’s study included green beans, pears and sweet potatoes. Sadly, after analyzing about 190 baby food samples, 92% of the pear samples tested positive for at least one pesticide. On the up side virtually none of the sweet potato baby food products contained any pesticide. On the down side, the pesticide iprodione which has been categorized as a probably carcinogen showed up in three baby food pear samples. The pesticide is not registered with the EPA for use on pears at all.

The EPW also publishes a list of produce that is least likely to test positive for pesticides. Those products include asparagus, cabbage, grapefruit, watermelon, eggplant, pineapple, frozen peas and sweet potatoes.

It’s important to note that this report is not designed to reflect the affects of pesticide exposure. It is specifically meant to measure the presence of pesticides in common fruits and vegetables in the produce aisle … and now the baby food aisle as well. Research is ongoing regarding the affects of those pesticides on consumers, which ones and in what amounts. But having an understanding of what pesticides are found and where, can help all consumers make better decisions at the grocery store. encourages you to read more about this fascinating report: Information like this helps us all to understand what’s really in our food.

Another clue to the obesity problem

Food Facts is keeping a close eye out news that can help our community and the people they reach in their communities understand more about and combat the growing obesity problem in our country. Today we came across a fascinating new study that we wanted to make sure we shared with you.

A study conducted by Planet Money/National Public Radio outlines how Americans are spending money on the foods they eat. It uncovered that the country is spending more of their food budgets on sweets and processed foods than they were 30 years ago, in 1982. And while spending more on those items, we are spending the same percentage on fruits and vegetables. The scale is tipping, but in the wrong direction.

On average consumers spend 14.6% of their grocery money on fruits and vegetables. In 1982, that figure was 14.5%. Back in 1982, the grocery budget allowance for sweets and processed foods was 11.6% — considerably less than the amount allocated for fruits and vegetables. Today, in 2012, that figure has risen a whopping 11.6% to 22.9%! That’s a fairly dramatic increase.

There were other changes reflected in American spending habits as well. Meats, for instance, dropped by almost 10% of expenditures. Dairy product expenditures dropped to 11.1% from 13.3%. And spending on grains and baked goods increased from 13.2% to 14.4%.

So it appears that the data which was compiled from the Bureau of Labor Statistics reflects increases in spending on foods that aren’t nutritionally important for us and decreases in foods that are actually good for us.

There are reasons to believe that cost plays a part in these statistical changes. There are some fruits and vegetables that are less expensive now than they were in 1982 (costs adjusted for inflation) and others that are markedly higher. But in today’s economic climate and consumers trying to do whatever they can to stretch their dollars and make them go further, the perception may, in fact, be different than the reality. It does appear that people look at processed foods as a less expensive alternative to fresh and are moved by their budgets as opposed to nutritional quality. The concept of convenience also rears its head here, as it’s acknowledged that the idea of packaged products is still very appealing in our busy day and age.

While finances are a concern for all Americans right now, Food Facts wonders if we’re not sacrificing our health in an effort to tighten our belts. And sadly, if we’re tightening our belts with our food budgets, maybe that’s making more of us need to loosen our belts – literally.

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Start thinking about more than Halloween when you think about Pumpkins!


It’s that time of year again and is getting ready.  In just 18 days, children everywhere will don their “scariest” costumes and ring our doorbells looking for waaay too much candy.  But before we get to that day, we embark on our traditional pumpkin carving experience.  Whether yours is scary or funny, male or female, big or small, it’s safe to say that after you’ve cleaned it, seeded it, scraped it and gotten the flesh out, you look at it and say what do I actually do with all this?

Sad to say, most of us aren’t thinking about eating it.  But before pumpkins became the jack-o-lantern tradition in millions of homes, they were just good, old-fashioned vegetables.  And as it turns out they’re vegetables we really need to be thinking about eating.  Pumpkin could actually be referred to as a super-vegetable.

Pumpkin is very low in calories.  One cup carries only about 30 calories.   Impressively, it incorporates  a long list of vitamins and minerals into that one cup serving.  Let’s take a look at some of them:

Folates                          Vitamin A                    Potassiumpumpkin-bread
Niacin                            Vitamin C                    Magnesium
Riboflavin                      Vitamin E                    Alpha-Carotene
Thiamin                         Vitamin K                    Beta-Carotene

That wonderful orange color of the ripe pumpkin tells you right away that it’s rich in carotenoids.  Both the Alpha  and Beta-Carotenes in pumpkin are converted by the body into vitamin A.  This supports healthy vision and proper immune function.  Beta-carotene is thought to reverse skin damage and also act as an anti-inflammatory.  Alpha-carotene possibly slows the aging process and is also thought to reduce the risk of cataracts.  Carotenoids are also thought to reduce the risk of heart disease.

Vitamin C reduces the risk of high blood pressure and heart disease.  Vitamin E is great for skin and may have an effect on your risk for specific cancers.    Potassium is great for bone health, energy production and blood pressure.  Magnesium also supports your immune system and bone health.  And this list doesn’t cover every nutrient that calls the pumpkin home.

pumpkin-soup-mdSo now that you know how good it is for you, you may be wondering exactly what you can use it for when cooking.  Pumpkin is surprisingly versatile and can be incorporated into many different dishes.  It has a mild, but distinctive flavor and lends itself well to a variety of preparations.  Here’s a quick list you might want to look into:

Pumpkin Ravioli                          Pumpkin Soup                Pumpkin Muffins  �
Pumpkin Bread                            Pumpkin Pudding          Pumpkin Pie                       Pumpkin Pancakes                      Pumpkin Stew               Pumpkin Lasagna �
                                       Pumpkin Mashed Potatoes         Pumpkin Quiche            Pumpkin Risotto

If you can add to this list, please do. is always looking for new and interesting recipes to add to our collection.

In the meantime,  happy pumpkin picking and pumpkin eating!   Oh … and Happy Halloween!

Pesticides linked to ADHD in Kids?

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Exposure to pesticides used on common kid-friendly foods — including frozen blueberries, fresh strawberries and celery — appears to boost the chances that children will be diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, new research shows.
Youngsters with high levels of pesticide residue in their urine, particularly from widely used types of insecticide such as malathion, were more likely to have ADHD, the behavior disorder that often disrupts school and social life, scientists in the United States and Canada found.

Kids with higher-than-average levels of one pesticide marker were nearly twice as likely to be diagnosed with ADHD as children who showed no traces of the poison.

“I think it’s fairly significant. A doubling is a strong effect,” said Maryse F. Bouchard, a researcher at the University of Montreal in Quebec and lead author of the study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics.

The take-home message for parents, according to Bouchard: “I would say buy organic as much as possible,” she said. “I would also recommend washing fruits and vegetables as much as possible.”
Diet is a major source of pesticide exposure in children, according to the National Academy of Sciences, and much of that exposure comes from favorite fruits and vegetables. In 2008, detectable concentrations of malathion were found in 28 percent of frozen blueberry samples, 25 percent of fresh strawberry samples and 19 percent of celery samples, a government report found.

ADHD affects 4.5 million U.S. kids
Bouchard’s study is the largest to date to look at the effect of pesticides on child development and behavior, including ADHD, which affects an estimated 4.5 million U.S. children. About 2.5 million kids take medication for the condition, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Bouchard and her colleagues measured levels of six pesticide metabolites in the urine of 1,139 children ages 8 to 15 selected from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2000 and 2004. The study included 119 children who were diagnosed with ADHD.

Unlike other studies of pesticides’ impact, Bouchard’s sample provided a glimpse into average insecticide exposure in the general population of children, not a specialized group, such as children of farm-workers. Because certain pesticides leave the body after three to six days, the presence of residue shows that exposure is likely constant, Bouchard said.

She found that kids with a 10-fold increase in the kind of metabolites left in the body after malathion exposure were 55 percent more likely to be diagnosed with ADHD. Because the researchers didn’t review the kids’ diets, they couldn’t say why some children had such high levels of pesticide residue. Children are at greater risk from pesticides because their young bodies are still developing and may not metabolize chemicals as well as adults’.
The most alarming finding was a near-doubling in odds of ADHD diagnoses among kids with higher-than-average levels of the most common of the six metabolites detected. Kids with high levels of dimethyl thiophosphate were 93 percent more likely to have the disorder than children with with undetectable levels of the marker.

The research may add to anxiety about ADHD, which has no known cause, said Dr. Andrew Adesman, chief of developmental and behavioral pediatrics at the Steven and Alexandra Cohen Children’s Medical Center of New York.

“It does seem to suggest that at non-extreme or more typical levels, there does seem to be some increased risk,” said Adesman, who is on the professional advisory board for Children and Adults with ADHD, an advocacy group.

Pesticides prey on nervous system
Boucher studied organophosphate pesticides, which account for as much as 70 percent of the pesticide use in the U.S. They work by interfering with the nervous systems of insects, but have a similar effect in mammals, including humans. Most people in the U.S. have residues of the products in their urine.

Cheminova, the Danish firm that is the leading manufacturer of malathion in the world, declined to comment on the conclusions of the new research. Diane Allemang, vice president for global regulatory affairs, said she hadn’t seen the study.
Parents of children with ADHD, however, said Bouchard’s work will give them one more thing to worry about.
“We’re all completely obsessed with food,” said Jamie Norman, 32, of Freeburg, Ill., whose 6-year-old son, Aidan, was diagnosed with ADHD six months ago.

The stimulant medication Aidan takes, Adderall XR, depresses his appetite, so Norman said she’s always trying to find good foods that he’ll want to eat. Other parents of kids with ADHD choose to use diet, not medication, to control the disorder and they’re constantly monitoring food, too.

News that some of the best foods for kids might be tainted with something linked to ADHD is worrisome, Norman said.
“I’ve known for some time that strawberries, in particular, contain high levels of pesticide, but as far as frozen fruit, I don’t give that a second thought,” she said.

Buy organic, make sure to wash

The best advice for parents — and anyone who wants to avoid pesticides — is to choose foods least likely to contain them. The Environmental Working Group, a consumer advocacy organization, advises shoppers to buy organic versions of a dozen fruits and vegetables that grow in the ground or are commonly eaten with the skin, because they’re most likely to be contaminated.

Make sure to wash all fruits and vegetables under cold running tap water and scrub firm-skinned produce with a brush. Be sure to rinse frozen fruits and vegetables, too.

But don’t wash produce with soap. The Food and Drug Administration says that could leave behind residues of detergent, yet more chemicals that everyone would do best to avoid.


Are Raw Foods Really Healthier than Cooked foods?

raw-vs-cooked teams up with our friends over at to to look into whether raw foods are healthier than Cooked foods. Raw food diets are getting a lot of attention lately, both on this blog and in the wider health community. The raw diet tied for the second best diet for weight loss in U.S. News‘ assessment, and raw cleanses are a hot trend this summer.

Supporters of the raw diet believe that raw fruits, vegetables and in some cases meat and dairy are the richest sources of vitamins, minerals, enzymes and other nutrients. While a plant-based raw diet is certainly very healthy, cooking some plants actually increases some nutrients and can also make nutrients more bio-available.
Once you start to look at the question of raw vs. cooked foods, it immediately becomes a complex matter. Nutrition science has become quite sophisticated, yet there’s still only a limited amount of research available on the subject. Some nutrients may be lost during the cooking process yet others are enriched by cooking and exposure to heat. Yet, there are still many gray areas when it comes to the importance of many vitamins, minerals and other phytochemicals. Below are some of the facts that we do have about raw vs. cooked foods, organized by nutrient.


Lycopene is an essential nutrient found in tomatoes, and is associated with lower rates of cancer. One study published in the British Journal of Nutrition found that one kind of lycopene is made more bioavailable by cooking. “Lycopene is a carotenoid, and all carotenoids, along with phenolic acids and flavonoids, are enhanced by cooking,” says Mary Hartley, RD, MPH Nutritionist for Calorie Count. She adds that studies have shown that carotenoid-rich foods are best eaten in the presence of fat or oil.

Vitamin C

“Heat readily destroys thiamine (B-1) and vitamin C,” says Hartley. Vitamin C is a highly unstable compound that is quickly degraded through oxidization and cooking. Scientific American reports that cooking tomatoes for just two minutes decreases their vitamin C content by ten percent.
“Foods high in thiamin include whole grain and enriched grain foods, fortified cereals, lean pork, wheat germ, legumes, and organ meats,” explains Hartley. “Vitamin C is found in many fruits and vegetables, especially red and green peppers, oranges, cantaloupe, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, baked potato, and cabbage.” She suggests eating a raw source of vitamin C every day.

B Vitamins

Like vitamin C, B vitamins are water soluble and can be lost through boiling. To decrease the loss of water soluble vitamins, choose cooking methods that minimize the use of water, such as grilling, roasting and microwaving. Making soups and stews will also preserve these vitamins in the broth. Raw sources of vitamin B include bananas, oysters, tuna and caviar. Liver is also a rich source of B vitamins, but we don’t recommend eating it raw.

Vitamins A, D, E and K

These vitamins appear to be unaffected by cooking. “Most nutrients, including fiber, carbohydrates, protein, fat, minerals, trace minerals, and all of vitamins A, D, E and K, remain when vegetables are cooked,” says Hartley.


“It is important to differentiate between enzymes that are needed for digestion and enzymes that naturally occur in foods,” points out Hartley. She explains that the enzymes found in food have no bearing on digestion. However, enzymes can have other effects on the body. “For instance, the myrosinase enzyme family and indoles found in cruciferous vegetables contain anti-cancer compounds that are destroyed by heat,” says Hartley. Cauliflower, cabbage, cress, bok choy, broccoli, Brussel sprouts, kale, kohlrabi, mustard, rutabaga and turnips are all cruciferous vegetables. However, cooking these vegetables also destroys goitrogenic enzymes that interfere with the formation of thyroid hormone. “It’s always a tradeoff, with some nutrients becoming more available and others becoming less available, when food is cooked.” dietsinreview1


Hartley and I agree that while some may swear by the raw food diet, it takes a lot of work and careful planning, not to mention the difficulty of giving up foods like cheese and bread. The bottom line is that it’s good to eat plenty of fruits and vegetables, no matter how they are prepared. Garlic and nuts are also best when eaten raw, along with fruits that are high in vitamin C. Adding more raw fruits and vegetables to your diet can also help with weight loss, because the fiber can help you feel full while consuming fewer calories.
Cooking makes many foods more appealing and enhances some nutrients, and also kills off bacteria, which is particularly important when it comes to meat and animal products. “Cooking (and careful chewing!) generally makes food more digestible by softening the fibers,” says Hartley. “People should eat a variety of cooked and raw foods, with a raw source of vitamin C eaten every day.”

Article written by Margaret Badore at

Safeway the latest to be snagged in grape tomato salmonella recall

grapetomatoes has learned that Grape tomatoes potentially contaminated by Salmonella have been recalled from a variety of retail locations, and in a variety of retail products. The latest company snagged, or snagged again, in the recall is Safeway, which is expanding its earlier recall to include “Eating Right Veggie Party Platter.” On May 2, the company had recalled cafe salads and deli salads made with grape tomatoes.

The contaminated tomatoes were from Taylor Farms, and grown by Six L’s. Other companies and products involved in the rolling recall include:

•Del Monte Fresh Produce N.A., Inc. (“Del Monte Fresh”) of Coral Gables, has been advised that a limited number of grape tomatoes in a specific lot of grape tomatoes grown in Florida by Six L’s Packing Company in Immokalee, Florida may be contaminated with Salmonella. The grape tomatoes may have been used in 63 cases of Vegetable Trays and Veg. Trio sold in Roche Bros. Supermarkets in the state of Massachusetts under the brand ROCHE BROS.

•Northeast Produce Inc. of Plainville, CT has been notified by grower Six L’s that a specific lot of grape tomatoes supplied to Northeast Produce Inc., may be contaminated with Salmonella. This product has been recalled by Six L’s. Northeast Produce Inc. is a customer of Six L’s and our recall is associated with the recall from Six L’s.

•Taylor Farms Pacific, Inc. of Tracy, CA has been notified by grower Six L’s that a specific lot of grape tomatoes supplied to Taylor Farms Pacific may be contaminated with Salmonella. This product has been recalled by Six L’s. This lot of grape tomatoes was used in the following products made by Taylor Farms Pacific for Albertsons, Raley’s, Safeway, Savemart, Sam’s Club, & Walmart and is being voluntarily recalled as a precautionary measure. No illnesses have been reported.

•In cooperation with Taylor Farms’ expanded voluntary recall of products containing grape tomatoes, Safeway is also expanding its voluntary recall to include fresh kabobs made with grape tomatoes sold in our full-service meat counter in several states. The kabobs were made using grape tomatoes supplied by Taylor Farms and sourced from grower Six L’s that were recalled due to possible Salmonella contamination.

•Mastronardi Produce of Kingsville, Ontario is voluntarily recalling a limited quantity of grape tomatoes.