Category Archives: Thanksgiving Turkey

Happy Fast Food Thanksgiving from Popeye’s

One of the biggest buzzwords of the 21st century thus far is “busy”. It’s extremely fashionable to be “busy” and it appears that the busier you are, the trendier you are, hence the term “just too busy”.

And out of this trend the continual need for all things convenient is sustained. We’re “too busy to iron clothes” so wrinkle-releaser was invented. We’re too busy to vacuum, so now we have robotic vacuums in various shapes and sizes that run around our floors on their own picking up dust. We’ve been too busy to mash our own potatoes for quite awhile now and we’ve been provided with an array of different boxed, dried instant products to choose from that supply us with a not-quite-reasonable facsimile of the real thing.

And today, FoodFacts.com discovered that it appears that we’re too busy to prepare our holiday meals as well! According to Popeye’s Chicken and Biscuits, we can leave the preparation of our Thanksgiving Turkey to them! It seems that we’ve been able to do that for about 13 years now (if not longer).

The idea of ordering a holiday meal for delivery is nothing new. As a society, we’ve been avoiding actual cooking for years. But would you actually order your Thanksgiving turkey from Popeye’s?

If you read the reviews from various internet sources, the answer is apparently a resounding YES! from hundreds of consumers. The Cajun-style fried holiday turkey from Popeye’s is rumored to be a very tasty bird. People look forward to ordering it every year for their holiday meal. ?????

Thanksgiving dinner from a fast food chain. Well … not exactly.

O.k. the bird is being offered for order from Popeye’s. Between 9 and 11 pounds, pre-cooked (flash-fried in the description) and $39.99 at specific locations. We did a little web hunting and discovered that the turkey appears to be coming from CajunGrocer.com. You can Google Popeye’s fried turkey Cajungrocer.com and you’ll find more than a few links that put the two together. If you order the turkey from CajunGrocer, you’ll pay about $12 more for it than if you order it directly from your participating Popeye’s.

Details on the turkey are difficult to discover. The Popeye’s website is pretty understated about this promotion. The only thing you’ll find is a participating store locator. When you input your zip code you’ll get a list of locations with a Cajun Turkey icon next to the address. There is no nutritional information or ingredient list for the product itself.
So we headed on over the CajunGrocer.com (http://www.cajungrocer.com/popeyes-cajun-fried-turkey-10-12-lbs-902.html). Here we got just a little more information. It states that prior to cooking the turkey is injected with a Creole butter marinade (no ingredients are included). We’ve also read that the turkey is rubbed with a spice blend. But that’s about all the information we can find here. Clicking the Nutrition Information tab simply brings us to a list with no accompanying data. And right next to the entry “Ingredients”, we find “cajun fried turkey.”

Honestly, FoodFacts.com finds this a bit suspect. We generally like transparency when it comes to our food and can’t help but wonder why we’re not getting it here. Nutritional information for the Popeye’s Cajun Fried Turkey should be available on both the Popeye’s website and the CajunGrocer.com website.

And honestly, we can’t wrap our heads around the concept of Thanksgiving dinner from Popeye’s. No offense intended. This turkey gets rave reviews. And it technically isn’t from a fast food place. But even so … it’s just not working for us. And if Popeye’s wants us to attempt to get with their Thanksgiving program, they can send us the ingredient list soon. Maybe then we’ll give it a try!

http://consumerist.com/2013/11/12/does-your-family-want-a-cajun-seasoned-fried-turkey-this-thanksgiving-from-popeyes/
http://www.cajungrocer.com/popeyes-cajun-fried-turkey-10-12-lbs-902.html

Our Thanksgiving Table: Roast Turkey … the holiday centerpiece

We’re getting closer to the big day and as we do, our thoughts turn repeatedly to the centerpiece of our table — the roast turkey!

There really isn’t much that compares to the aroma of a golden brown turkey roasting away in the oven on Thanksgiving morning. And then there are the leftovers! The possibilities are endless … turkey sandwiches with gravy, turkey pot pies, turkey and stuffing casseroles are just a few of our favorites.

Gather round our table where the turkey is the Thanksgiving day main event. But sadly, the centerpiece of our meal can inflict a heavy dose of fat and calories on the holiday dinner. The typical roast turkey prepared in the traditional manner supplies about 400 calories per serving with 16 grams of fat, 7 grams of saturated fat and 994 mg of sodium.

Did the pilgrims actually include a turkey in their original Thanksgiving feast? The jury’s out on this one. It appears that in Massachusetts in 1621 there were plenty of wild turkeys keeping the colonists company. So it would certainly seem natural that a bird would be part of that original dinner thanking God for the harvest and for the colonists’ survival in the new world (which was not an easy feat). The pilgrims celebrated that first Thanksgiving for three days – so we’d have to assume that more than one wild turkey was included. That was quite a feast!

While we love the roast turkey, we also love the rest of the meal and want to enjoy it in its entirety without worrying about compromising our healthy lifestyle in order to do so. That can become difficult when most of the side dishes we love so much are very high in calories and fat, as well as sodium. So what can we do about keeping our turkey at reasonable fat and calorie levels, without sacrificing any of that marvelous flavor? We’d also like to make sure that we keep our favorite, old-fashioned aromas wafting through our homes in the morning hours of Thanksgiving day.

This healthier recipe will ensure both the flavor and fragrance of a winning roast turkey. The apples and onions help to keep the bird from drying out, so that you’ll achieve that moist texture that’s so important.

Here’s what you’ll need:

• 1 10- to 12-pound turkey
• 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
• 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley, plus a few sprigs
• 1 tablespoon chopped fresh sage, plus a few sprigs
• 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme, plus a few sprigs
• 1 teaspoon salt
• 1 teaspoon black pepper
• 1 1/2 pounds small onions, peeled and halved lengthwise, divided
• 1 tart green apple, quartered
• 3 cups water, plus more as needed

Directions
• Position rack in lower third of oven; preheat to 475°F.
• Remove giblets and neck from turkey cavity.
• Place the turkey, breast-side up, on a rack in a large roasting pan; pat dry with paper towels.
• Combine oil, chopped parsley, sage, thyme, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Rub the herb mixture all over the turkey, under the skin and onto the breast meat. Place herb sprigs, half of the onions and apple in the cavity. Add 3 cups water to the pan.
• Roast the turkey until the skin is golden brown, 45 minutes. Remove the turkey from the oven. Cover the breast with foil, cutting as necessary to fit. Add remaining onions to the pan around the turkey. Reduce oven temperature to 350° and continue roasting a thermometer registers 165°F, 1 to 1 3/4 hours more. If the pan dries out, add more water.
• Transfer the turkey to a serving platter (reserve pan juices and onions for gravy) and tent with foil.

This will make for a great turkey day experience for everyone. Flavorful and moist for less than half the calories and fat of a traditional recipe. The apples really add to the flavor and aroma of the bird. We love adding this healthy option to the FoodFacts.com Thanksgiving table and can’t wait to sit down to this year’s better-for-us feast!