Category Archives: Pumpkin Pie

We finally found the needle in the haystack — a real pumpkin product!

organicslide3Since the fall season began, FoodFacts.com has been on a bit of a mission. We’ve all been inundated with absolutely everything pumpkin this year. Pumpkin is in everything — or so fast food chains and food manufacturers are trying to tell us. But, for the most part, there’s really no actual pumpkin, or “pumpkin spice” in the lattes, coffees, donuts, puddings, waffles, toaster pastries or the other plethora of products we’re being offered.

We’ve located very few of these fall-flavored products that contain the ingredient they’re named for. And honestly, of those few we have located, the ingredient lists made us shy away from them anyway.

What’s a pumpkin lover to do?

Maybe you want to try Cedar’s Pumpkin Spice Hommos. If you enjoy hommos and the flavors of fall, this product really does have it all.

Nutrition Facts:

Serving Size: 2 tablespoons

Calories:              60
Fat:                      3.5 grams
Sodium:              55 mg
Sugar:                 3 grams

Ingredients: Fresh Steamed Chickpeas, Pumpkin, Water, Sunflower Oil, Sesame Tahini, Garlic, Sea Salt, Sugar, Citric Acid, Cinnamon, Nutmeg, Cumin, Guar Gum.

Pumpkin. Nutmeg. No controversial ingredients. Enviable nutrition facts. We haven’t found a pumpkin product that has this much to talk about all season long!

So, if you’ve been searching for the needle in the pumpkin haystack the same way we have here at FoodFacts.com, you may want to head out to the grocery store to give Cedar’s Pumpkin Spice Hommos a try. It’s great to be able to share some news about a pumpkin product you can feel good about!

http://www.cedarsfoods.com/products/hommus/all-natural-hommus-8-oz-16-oz/pumpkin-spice/

Pushing the pumpkin envelope … Chobani Pumpkin Spice Yogurt

blended-pumpkin-spice-53ozSome would say it’s out of control. Others can’t get enough. Pumpkin flavored food products are absolutely everywhere this fall. We’ve been trying to keep up with all of them, but admittedly it’s been pretty hard. It does feel as though almost every new product introduced has the word pumpkin somewhere on its label. So what’s next?

Yogurt. Yep — Chobani has introduced Pumpkin Spice Yogurt.

We have to admit, we really aren’t able to exclaim, “Wow, that sounds so good!” But FoodFacts.com also has to admit that in comparison to the majority of pumpkin-flavored products flooding our grocery stores, restaurants and fast food chains, this one is actually something you might consider eating.

Let’s take a look:

Calories:                130
Fat:                        3 grams
Sugar:                   12 grams

Not bad. Low in calories. Low in fat. And the sugar content is pretty much on par with other Greek yogurt products.

But what about the ingredients?

Lowfat Yogurt (Cultured Pasteurized Nonfat Milk, Cream, Live and Active Cultures: S. Thermophilus, L. Bulgaricus, L. Acidophilus, Bifidus and L. Casei), Evaporated Cane Juice, Water, Pumpkin Puree, Pectin, Spice, Natural Flavors, Locust Bean Gum, Lemon Juice Concentrate.

O.k., we don’t like the natural flavors. But that’s about all we see here that would get flagged in the FoodFacts.com Food Score system. And let’s not forget to mention that this yogurt contains real, actual pumpkin puree, unlike the majority of products currently available.

So, if you’ve just got to have a pumpkin-flavored something, you might actually consider the Chobani Pumpkin-Spice yogurt. While fall-flavored Greek yogurt might not seem as alluring as that pumpkin muffin or latte, it’s a much better choice overall. After all, it contains the real thing!

http://www.chobani.com/products/blended#pumpkin-spice

Our Thanksgiving Table: Saving the best for last – Pumpkin Pie!

We’ve all admitted that Thanksgiving dinner could never be a complete experience without dessert – and more specifically, pie. And even more specifically, pumpkin pie!

It’s a turkey day tradition … and some form of pumpkin pie (although not the one we enjoy today) could have easily been present during that first Thanksgiving feast in the early 1600s. Early American settlers of Plimoth Plantation, the first permanent European settlement in southern New England, might have made a “pumpkin-pie-like treat” by making stewed pumpkins or by filling a hollowed out shell with milk, honey and spices, and then baking it in hot ashes.

A recipe for pumpkin pie appears in a 1651 cookbook from France. This recipe is the first that includes a pie crust making the dish fairly identical to the pumpkin pie we enjoy today.

We’ve almost finished our meal around the FoodFacts.com Thanksgiving table. So let’s enjoy our favorite Thanksgiving dessert. Sad thing is that when we indulge in this traditional compliment to our holiday meal, it will cost us upwards of 400 calories per slice with a hefty 14.3 grams of fat per serving.

We don’t want to feel guilty about this great dessert. We want to enjoy it, savoring each bite. And the only way we can think about doing this (especially immediately following that incredible meal we all just shared), is to find a way to lighten up this recipe WITHOUT sacrificing any of the flavor.

Here’s what you’ll need:
3/4 cup dark brown sugar, packed
1 large egg
2 large egg whites
1 can evaporated skim milk
1/4 tsp finely grated orange zest
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp ground ginger
1/4 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
1/4 tsp salt
1 can pumpkin puree
1 frozen pie shell, thawed
For the topping:
1/4 cup whipping cream

Directions:
1. Position oven rack to lowest position. Preheat oven to 425° F.
2. Combine all ingredients except pumpkin in a large bowl, stirring with a whisk. Add pumpkin, and continue stirring until smooth.
3. Pour pumpkin mixture into the crust. Bake for 10 minutes, then reduce oven temperature to 350° F (do not remove pie from oven); bake an additional 50 minutes, or until a knife inserted in the middle comes out clean. Cool completely on wire rack.
4. To prepare topping, beat cream with a mixer at high speed until stiff peaks form. Serve with pie (1 Tbsp per slice).

This recipe produces a very flavorful pumpkin pie! It also brings the calories down to 210 per slice with 6 grams of fat! That’s a pretty significant savings of fat and calories!!

We’ve really enjoyed having you all gather together around our Thanksgiving table at FoodFacts.com. If you’ve been following along with us, you’ll know that the traditional dinner we’ve profiled came in at 1766 calories and 83 grams of fat for Roast Turkey, Cornbread and Sausage Stuffing, Candied Yams, Cranberry Sauce and Pumpkin Pie. We’ve outlined some lighter recipes for that same Thanksgiving meal. It now comes in at 876 calories and 23.4 grams of fat. That’s over 50% less calories and over 71% less fat than the traditional recipes we’re all used it.

FoodFacts.com is excited to sit down to our healthier feast this Thanksgiving. We hope you give some of these lighter ideas a try. You’ll not only feel good about the nutritional value of your holiday meal – your family will feel good about the wonderful flavors and aromas rising from your kitchen this holiday season.

Happy Thanksgiving from FoodFacts.com!