Category Archives: Processed Meats

Tyson closing two plants … good financial sense or decreasing demand from the center aisles?

TysonTruck_EmbeddedHere at FoodFacts.com we spend a lot of time talking about preparing fresh, whole foods in our own kitchens and buying ingredients instead of prepared dishes. We know that shopping the perimeter aisles of our grocery stores gives us a head start on healthier eating and we avoid those center aisles where boxes and cans take up shelf space. Tyson is one of the brands we’d find living in those aisles … it’s one of the brands that symbolizes the prepared foods we’re making every effort to avoid. So the news about Tyson closing two plants citing aging facilities and the vague “changing product needs” can easily lead us to believe that the decision may certainly be grounded in decreasing demand from the center aisles.

Tyson Foods Inc. announced plans to close the company’s prepared foods facilities in Jefferson, Wis., and Chicago. Production at the plants will cease Oct. 1, 2016, during the second half of the company’s fiscal year. Tyson said the plant closings will enable the company to transfer production to some of its other prepared foods operations.

Tyson attributed the closings to a combination of factors, including changing product needs and the age of both facilities. The company added that the costs to renovate the facilities were prohibitive. The distance of the Chicago plant from its raw material supply also was a factor.

“We examined many options before we turned down this road,” said Donnie King, president of North American operations. “This affects the lives of our team members and their families, making it a very difficult decision. But after long and careful consideration, we’ve determined we can better serve our customers by shifting production and equipment to more modern and efficient locations.”

Consumer demand drives many of the decisions coming from food giants like Tyson. Consumer voices have driven big manufacturers to drop the use of controversial ingredients from popular products, discontinue the use of genetically modified ingredients and create healthier product lines. It shouldn’t come as a surprise that a plants manufacturing processed foods (whether for consumer, deli or hospitality purposes) might be losing ground in a marketplace increasingly made up of more educated and conscious consumers.

While those center aisles are still heavily populated with boxes, cans, bags and jars, the consumers shopping those aisles are lessening in numbers. This news from Tyson may not be associated with changing attitudes and lifestyles, we feel pretty positive that it’s not the only news we’ll be getting from big food manufacturers regarding a decreasing need for processing plants.

http://www.foodbusinessnews.net/articles/news_home/Business_News/2015/11/Tyson_to_close_prepared_foods.aspx?ID=%7BFB86979D-3005-4BF0-81AD-F5D1B716CCB2%7D&cck=1

Heart failure linked to process red meat in a new study

iStock_000041301708SmallWe know is that animal fats aren’t the good fats our bodies need. And we know that red meat is best consumed in moderation and then only the leanest cuts should be considered. We’ve also learned the enormous benefits of a plant-based diet, especially for those who have experienced heart problems. With all that in mind, this new research certainly makes a great deal of sense. It concerns processed red meats — things like sausage, hot dogs and lunch meats, and its results are fairly substantial.

According to a study in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Heart Failure, men who consume moderate amounts of processed red meat may have an increased risk of occurrence and death from heart failure.

“Processed red meat commonly contains sodium, nitrates, phosphates and other food additives, and smoked and grilled meats also contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, all of which may contribute to the increased heart failure risk,” said Alicja Wolk, D.M.Sc., senior author of the study and professor at the Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden. “Unprocessed meat is free from food additives and usually has a lower amount of sodium.”

The Cohort of Swedish Men study is, in fact, the first to investigate the effects of processed red meat independently from unprocessed red meat. It included 37,035 men age 45 to 79 years of age with no history of heart failure, ischemic heart disease, or cancer. Study participants finished a questionnaire on food intake and other lifestyle factors. Researchers followed them from 1998 to the date of heart failure diagnosis, death, or the end of the study in 2010.

After almost 12 years of follow-up, researchers found that heart failure was diagnosed in 2,891 men and 266 died from heart failure. Also, men who ate the most processed red meat (75 grams per day or more) had a 28 percent higher risk of heart failure compared to men who ate the least (25 grams per day or less) after adjusting for multiple lifestyle variables. The risk of heart failure or death among those who ate unprocessed red meat didn’t increase.

Results of the study for total red meat consumption are in line with findings from the Physicians’ Health Study, which found that men who ate the highest amount of red meat had a 24 percent higher risk of heart failure incidence compared to those who ate the least.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, some 5.1 million people in the United States have heart failure, with about half of those who develop heart failure dying within five years of diagnosis.

Processed meats are notorious for containing some specific controversial ingredients, like nitrates. They’re also too high in sodium. For years, conflicting research has been presented on links between processed meats and cancer and elevated blood pressure. So while this new link may not be surprising, the extent of the findings may well be. FoodFacts.com thinks it makes sense for consumers to be more aware of the amount of processed meats they are eating. Some items are more recognizable as processed than others. Pepperoni, salami, sausage and bacon are easy to identify. Some consumers may not realize, however, that the roast beef purchased at the deli counter is actually a processed meat. Let’s stay aware of our consumption to help protect our health.

Read more: http://www.sciencerecorder.com/news/processed-red-meat-may-hurt-your-heart-researchers-say/#ixzz34r3Wcm1t

Could processed meats be a factor in premature death?

FoodFacts.com has never been an advocate of consuming processed anything – and that includes processed meats. There are so many inherent problems with it … controversial ingredients, excessive sodium levels, unnecessary fats. It’s just not a healthy food choice for anyone.

Today we read about a new study that confirms those feelings and raises questions about the consequences of including processed meats in our diets. This exceptionally large study involved more than 500,000 men and women and showed a link between processed meat, cardiovascular disease and cancer.

The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study involved ten different countries. The inclusion of processed meat in diets was linked with other unhealthy choices. Those men and women who ate the most processed meat also were found to eat the fewest fruits and vegetables. They were also more likely to smoke cigarettes. And those men who consumed high levels of processed meats also tended to report a higher alcohol consumption as well.

The risk of premature death (from any cause) rose with the amount of processed meats consumed. This remained true after factoring in other variables. While the consumption of some red meat appeared to be beneficial in the diet, the high consumption of processed meats had a decidedly negative effect on longevity.

While it’s true that vegetarians are found to have an overall healthier lifestyle – they are less likely to smoke or be overweight and tend to be more physically active than meat eaters, this study helped to isolate the effects of eating processed meats from other lifestyle choices.

The study did conclude that the risks of dying sooner from cancer and cardiovascular disease increase with the amount of processed meat eating. It’s possible that 3% of premature deaths every year might be prevented if people can eat less than 20 grams of processed meat each day.

FoodFacts.com wants to stress again that the consumption of processed meats is unnecessary in our diets. There are better choices to be made that are fresh and healthier that bring us the benefits of protein and vitamins. Let’s all remain aware of our choices and continue to make the most educated dietary choices possible for ourselves and our families.

Read more here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/257332.php