Category Archives: Low Fat Dairy

Forget about dunking … Nesquik wants you to drink your milk and cookies

B1G1-Nesquik-Milk-CouponEvery day in millions of homes across America, kids come home from school to the snack they’ve been waiting for all day — a glass of milk with cookies that they will dunk into that glass. When the cookies are gone, most of those children will happily drink the milk that’s full of soaked cookie crumbs. It’s almost a tradition. Throw some Girl Scout Cookies in the mix, and you’ve got some pretty happy kids!

Here at FoodFacts.com, we’ve had our share of problems with Girl Scout Cookies. Most varieties contain ingredients that no one needs to consume — most especially kids. We know everyone has their guilty pleasures, but there really are better cookie choices out there.

So we were surprised to find that not only has Nesquik attempted to reinvent milk and cookies — but has decided to do that with two popular Girl Scout Cookie flavors. We’ll admit it, we didn’t expect these “innovations” to be acceptable even before we started investigating.

What did we find?

Caramel Coconut Milk is inspired by the Samoa Girl Scout Cookie. Unfortunately this particular Girl Scout Cookie is one of the line’s biggest ingredient offenders. The Nesquik Caramel Coconut Milk doesn’t offer much of an improvement over the cookie. And the nutrition facts certainly leave much to be desired.

Remember that there are “about two” servings in the Nesquik milk container. We’re going to list the facts from the label — and then the facts on the label doubled, just in case your child actually drinks (gasp) the whole container.

Single Serving                              Whole Container
Calories                                                        160                                                  320
Fat                                                                 2.5 grams                                       5 grams
Sugar                                                            24 grams                                        48 grams

6 teaspoons of sugar in half the container. 12 teaspoons of sugar in the whole container. We don’t know anyone — adult or child — that needs to consume 12 teaspoons of sugar in their milk.

Ingredients: Low Fat milk with Vitamin A Palmitate and Vitamin D3 added, Sugar, Less Than 2% of Natural and Artificial Flavors, Cocoa Processed with Alkali, Calcium Carbonate, Cellulose Gel, Salt, Carrageenan, Cellulose Gum.

The Samoa cookie is a coconut cookie and does contain actual coconut. The milk contains natural and artificial flavor — and that’s where the coconut is coming from. The flavor concept doesn’t seem to be much of an innovation to begin with. Coconut milk with chocolate syrup and vanilla syrup would probably do the trick here and depending on your product choices, you could easily leave out the questionable ingredients featured in this product.

How about the Thin Mints flavored milk?

To be perfectly honest, we didn’t agree with the flavor choice. Minty milk didn’t ring any bells for anyone here. And if it did, we could mix this one up ourselves too. Peppermint oil and chocolate syrup would do the trick.

Rinse and repeat the nutrition facts from the Caramel Coconut milk for the Thin Mints milk. They’re exactly the same.

Disturbingly, the ingredient list for the Thin Mints milk is also EXACTLY THE SAME as the Caramel Coconut milk. So where there should be peppermint in the list somewhere, you’ll find natural and artificial flavors taking their place. Same recipe, different chemical concoctions mimicking the real flavors that define the product.

We’re hoping that the real milk and cookies tradition wins out over these poor excuses for the real thing. We’re fairly positive that even if the taste comes close, there’s something irreplaceable about leftover, soaked cookie crumbs settled on the bottom of a glass of fresh, cold milk. At least, we hope so!

https://www.nesquik.com/adults/products/nesquikreadytodrink/caramel-coconut.aspx#

For women, low-fat and non-fat dairy may be linked to developing coronary heart disease

FoodFacts.com has always been a proponent of consuming real foods. After the years we’ve spent developing our comprehensive database, it has become very apparent that low-fat, non-fat products can also contain the controversial ingredients we encourage our community to avoid. Manufacturers tend to make up for the reduction in fats with food additives that help them to mimic the tastes and textures of the original full-fat versions of these foods. Now, there appears to be another reason we should be avoiding low-fat or no-fat dairy products, especially if we’re female.

A new study out of the University of California in San Diego has illustrated the possibility that consuming low-fat or no fat dairy … like low-fat cheese or skim milk may increase the risk of developing coronary heart disease.

It was found that women who consume low-fat cheese (sometimes or often) were at a 132% increased risk for developing CHD (coronary heart disease) and a 48% increased risk if they consumed non-fat milk (either sometimes or often). This is when compared to those women who rarely or never consumed either food.

The research collected data from over 700 men and 1,000 women in a community of older adults. These participants were followed for about 16 years and tracked for fatal and non-fatal coronary heart disease. Those participants who developed CHD were more likely to be older men with a higher body mass index and total cholesterol level than those without the disease.

However, for the women studied, there was an association between the consumption of low-fat and no-fat dairy products and their risk for CHD. In fact, even after the researchers adjusted for age, BMI and cholesterol, the link was still apparent. The higher the consumption of low-fat cheese and non-fat milk among these women, the higher their risk for coronary heart disease.

The researchers noted that CHD is a preventable disease. In fact, patients who consume a plant-based diet after diagnosis have been known to either reverse the disease or stop its progression.

FoodFacts.com understands that real foods that exclude those labeled low-fat, non-fat, light, sugar-free are healthier options for the population. Actually processed foods that don’t carry those terms need to have their ingredient lists closely scanned as well. But with the information carried in this study, there are new reasons to carefully consider the consumption of low-fat/no-fat dairy products for these very specific, very important reasons.

http://www.foodconsumer.org/newsite/Nutrition/Food/dairy_products_coronary_heart_disease_0105130445.html