Category Archives: healthy eating

Taking a turn in the wrong direction — unhealthy eating outpaces healthy eating globally

BLT-10-010710-FaWe get a lot of good news regarding the increase in fruit and vegetable consumption around the world. So FoodFacts.com was dismayed to read a new study containing information conflicting with the idea that consumers are becoming increasingly aware of the quality of their diets.

Worldwide, consumption of healthy foods such as fruit and vegetables has improved during the past two decades, but has been outpaced by the increased intake of unhealthy foods including processed meat and sweetened drinks in most world regions, according to the first study to assess diet quality in 187 countries covering almost 4.5 billion adults, published in The Lancet Global Health journal.

Improvements in diet quality between 1990 and 2010 have been greatest in high-income nations, with modest reductions in the consumption of unhealthy foods and increased intake of healthy products. However, people living in many of the wealthiest regions (eg, the USA and Canada, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand) still have among the poorest quality diets in the world, because they have some of the highest consumption of unhealthy food worldwide.

In contrast, some countries in sub-Saharan Africa and some countries in Asia (eg, China and India) have seen no improvement in their diet quality over the past 20 years.

The authors warn that the study presents a worrying picture of increases in unhealthy eating habits outpacing increases in healthy eating patterns across most world regions, and say that concerted action is needed to reverse this trend.

Led by Dr Fumiaki Imamura from the Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit at the University of Cambridge in the UK, a team of international researchers analysed data on the consumption of 17 key food items and nutrients related to obesity and major non-communicable diseases (eg, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and diet-related cancers) in countries around the world, and changes in diets between 1990 and 2010.

This analysis was performed by the Global Burden of Diseases Nutrition and Chronic Diseases Expert Group (NutriCoDE), chaired by Dr Dariush Mozaffarian, senior author on the paper and dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University. NutriCoDE is an ongoing project assessing dietary information from more than 300 dietary surveys across the world and UN Food and Agriculture food-balance sheets, covering almost 90% of the global adult population.

The international team examined three different diet patterns: a favourable one based on 10 healthy food items (fruit, vegetables, beans and legumes, nuts and seeds, whole grains, milk, total polyunsaturated fatty acids, fish, omega-3s, and dietary fibre); an unfavourable one defined by seven unhealthy items (unprocessed meats, processed meats, sugar-sweetened drinks, saturated fat, trans fat, dietary cholesterol, and sodium); and an overall diet pattern based on all 17 food groups. The researchers calculated a diet score for each pattern and assessed differences by country, age, sex, and national income, with a higher score indicating a healthier diet (range 0-100).

The findings reveal that diet patterns vary widely by national income, with high-income countries generally having better diets based on healthy foods (average score difference +2.5 points), but substantially poorer diets due to a higher intake of unhealthy foods compared with low-income countries (average score difference -33.0 points). On average, older people and women seem to consume better diets.

The highest scores for healthy foods were noted in several low-income countries (eg, Chad and Mali) and Mediterranean nations (eg, Turkey and Greece), possibly reflecting favourable aspects of the Mediterranean diet. In contrast, low scores for healthy foods were shown for some central European countries and republics of the former Soviet Union (eg, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, and Kyrgyzstan).

Of particular interest was that the large national differences in diet quality were not seen, or were far less apparent, when overall diet quality (including both healthy and unhealthy foods) was examined as previous studies have done.

“By 2020, projections indicate that non-communicable diseases will account for 75% of all deaths. Improving diet has a crucial role to play in reducing this burden,” says Dr Imamura. “Our findings have implications for governments and international bodies worldwide. The distinct dietary trends based on healthy and unhealthy foods, we highlight, indicate the need to understand different, multiple causes of these trends, such as agricultural, food industry, and health policy. Policy actions in multiple domains are essential to help people achieve optimal diets to control the obesity epidemic and reduce non-communicable diseases in all regions of the world.”

According to Dr Mozaffarian, “There is a particularly urgent need to focus on improving diet quality among poorer populations. If we do nothing, undernutrition will be rapidly eclipsed by obesity and non-communicable diseases, as is already being seen in India, China, and other middle-income countries.”

Unfortunately, the availability of low-quality, nutritionally deficient foods remains a wedge between consumers worldwide and healthier diets. It appears that the choice between healthier foods and junk foods continues to be a global problem that needs to be addressed in order to insure the future well being of every population. Let’s make sure that we remain committed to healthy food and healthy choices for ourselves and everyone we love.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/02/150218191719.htm

Heinz wants you to spice up that burger — introducing new Sriracha Flavored Ketchup

heinzsrirachaketchupLooking for a little zip with your ketchup? Heinz has just the thing for you — the new Heinz Tomato Kechup Blended with Sriracha Flavor!

It will feature the recognizable taste of ketchup, with an added kick from spicy chili pepper and garlic flavors.

In a press release Joseph Giallanella, Brand Manager of Heinz Tomato Ketchup said: “We are thrilled to announce that Heinz Tomato Ketchup Blended with Sriracha Flavor will join the beloved Heinz Ketchup portfolio.” Giallanella added, “Building off of our successful line of flavored ketchups, fans told us that they would love another bold take on their favorite condiment. The new offering adds a new kick to your favorite foods and recipes, pairing well with cheeseburgers, French fries and hot dogs, and is the perfect flavor boost for chicken and eggs.”

While the flavor may, in fact, add a boost to foods, FoodFacts.com is just as concerned with the ingredients. So, here they are:

TOMATO CONCENTRATE FROM RED RIPE TOMATOES, DISTILLED VINEGAR, HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP, CORN SYRUP, SALT, NATURAL FLAVORING, PAPRIKA EXTRACTIVES

That Sriracha flavor sure sounds good — but where is it in the list?????? Oh that must be what that natural flavoring is all about! And, of course, there’s high-fructose corn syrup.

Heinz, most consumers like to find the actual ingredient flavoring the product in the ingredient list. To find anything else leaves us feeling somewhat ripped off.

Some products sound much better than they actually are. This is one of them.

http://pittsburgh.cbslocal.com/2015/02/10/heinz-unveils-new-sriracha-ketchup-flavor/
http://www.heinzketchup.com/Products/Heinz%20%20Ketchup%20Blended%20with%20Sriracha%20Flavor%2014oz

Women following Mediterranean diet reduce their risk of ischemic stroke

medi3112014We’re constantly hearing about the health benefits of the Mediterranean diet. It’s low in saturated fat, high in monounsaturated fat and dietary fiber. It’s also not a diet — it’s an eating lifestyle originally inspired by the traditional dietary patterns of Greece, Southern Italy, and Spain. Mediterranean diet basics include high consumption of olive oil, legumes, unrefined cereals, fruits, and vegetables, moderate to high consumption of fish, moderate consumption of dairy products (mostly as cheese and yogurt), moderate wine consumption, and low consumption of meat and meat products. The diet has been shown to be more effective than a low-fat diet in lowering cholesterol and high blood pressure and promotes cardiovascular health.

Now, a new study reveals that Mediterranean diet is beneficial for women as it can lower ischemic stroke by 18 percent. This is mostly effective if women will strictly follow their Mediterranean diet.

For the study, the researchers analyzed the response of more than 100,000 female educators and administrators who answered the California Teachers Study and surveyed their data. The participants answered food-frequency questionnaires to analyze their diets then they were group based on the frequency of having a Mediterranean diet.

For the analysis, the researchers adjusted all factors that can affect the result such assmoking history, exercise and BMI. After adjusting all factors, the researchers found out that indeed, teachers who often had Mediterranean diet had lower risk of stroke.

As Ayesha Sherzai said, the study showed that women who closely followed the Mediterranean diet cut their stroke risk by up to 18 percent. Sherzai is a neurologist and one of the authors of the study.

For the research, Mediterranean diet means having a diet that includes plenty of legumes, vegetables, olive oil and nuts, and smaller amounts of full-fat dairy products and red meat.

According to the researchers, aside from lowering risk of ischemic stroke, this type of diet has been linked to lower risk of cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. a Harvard study also reported that Mediterranean diet helps in lowering inflammation and also helps in increasing the longevity.

“Eating a mostly plant-based diet and eating less meat and saturated fats can make a real difference in stroke risk,” said Sherzai.

FoodFacts.com wants to emphasize that the Mediterranean diet is simple to incorporate into your healthy lifestyle. It’s a satisfying dietary option, offering tremendous variety and flavor. And let’s not forget that the health benefits just keep adding up!

http://www.smnweekly.com/mediterranean-diet-benefits-women-by-reducing-risk-of-ischemic-stroke/15818/

Starbucks gives non-dairy fans a reason to smile — coconut milk!

2D274907784499-starbucks.blocks_desktop_largeMore and more consumers are looking for non-dairy options for everything from their cereal to their coffee. And for some … soy milk has taken a back seat to other options they consider more healthful.  Coconut milk is becoming one of the favorite non-dairy options for so many. It tastes great and people are thrilled with the health benefits it offers.  While finding non-dairy options beyond soy milk has been a bit difficult for consumers, some forward-thinking coffee chains have been embracing the needs of the non-dairy consumer.   Starbucks is the latest chain to join the trend.

Starbucks announced it’s adding coconut milk to its menu starting later in February.

The coffee chain said customers have been asking for a non-dairy alternative to soy, and Starbucks chose coconut milk over almond milk because of fewer “allergen challenges,” according to a statement. But the brand’s latest option appears to have several additional benefits — including a potentially better cup of joe than other milk alternatives.

A Starbucks spokesperson told Today.com that more than 84,000 people voted that the brand should introduce another non-dairy alternative on its website, and it tested coconut milk in about 600 stores last year to see what customers thought.

Starbucks chose coconut milk because its “rich creaminess” tasted best with its coffee and espresso, the spokesperson added.

Alex Bernson, a barista for eight years who now writes for the Portland-based coffee website Sprudge, is no stranger to the alternative milk debate. He told Today.com that coconut milk is a good choice because it foams well — meaning you can have a real non-dairy cappuccino.

“Rice milk, you can’t steam at all. It gets hot but it doesn’t have any sort of foam,” said Bernson, who worked at several independent coffee shops. “Hemp doesn’t steam well and kind of tastes like milk that’s in the bottom of the bowl when you finish Lucky Charms.”

As for soy, Starbucks’ current only option for the non-dairy crowd, “it’s not the greatest,” Bernson said of the milk’s foaming abilities.

He questioned the mass market appeal of milks made from rice or hemp, for example, but noted coconut has already proven to be popular.

“There’s definitely been a coconut water craze in the last five years,” he said. “You see coconut oil used in lots of things, in holistic health and cooking.”

While soy has been a popular milk alternative for years, customers might be shifting away from soy milk for several reasons. Dana James, a nutritionist based in New York City, pointed out that it has more calories than milks made from nuts, like coconut.

“A cup of soy is 120 calories, versus a cup of coconut milk which can be anywhere from 40 to 60 calories,” James told Today.com. Aside from additional calories, soy has been a controversial product for some time.

“It’s believed that 95 percent of soy is genetically modified, and it really raises concern for people,” James said.

Research into soy’s role in breast cancer is conflicted, but doctors suggest soy, like everything else, is okay in moderation. But while nut allergies are a well-known concern, some people may also have trouble tolerating soy.

Starbucks will offer coconut milk in its stores starting February 17. Just like soy milk, the option will cost customers 60 cents.

Starbucks joins a few other coffee chains who are catering to the needs of the substantial dairy-free population with an option other than soy milk. For instance, you can already find almond milk at Dunkin Donuts. FoodFacts.com is thrilled that Starbucks is recognizing the health needs of non-dairy consumers everywhere!

http://www.today.com/food/starbucks-offer-coconut-milk-coffees-lattes-2D80476816

Women drinking four cups of coffee every day reduce their risk of endometrial cancer

dgb550-cups._V162759609_Morning coffee. There are many people who can just hear the phrase and actually smell it, taste it and savor it in their mind. It wakes us up and somehow soothes us at the same time. Better yet, we know that there are health benefits associated with our favorite morning beverage.  FoodFacts.com knows, though, that many are concerned with caffeine and try to limit their daily consumption. And, certainly, no one likes the jittery, bouncing off the wall feeling we can easily relate to consuming too much caffeine. We’ve just learned of yet another health benefit from coffee and thought it important to share — especially with the women in our community.

A new study has shown that a cup coffee may be more than enough in reducing women’s risk to endometrial cancer; researchers having evaluated dietary habits in more than 2,800 women diagnosed with the disease. The study found out that women who drank up to four cups of coffee on a daily basis had an 18% lowered risk of contracting endometrial cancer compared to women who drank less.

One trial test concluded that 37 ounces of coffee on a daily basis reduced endometrial cancer risk by 18% with another one attributing a reduction on 26 ounces a day. Endometrial Cancer is the most common type of cancer on female reproductive organs in the U.S., affecting nearly 1 of 37 women in their lifetime.

Researchers found a link between Coffee and lowered risk of endometrial cancer but not the cause and effect; the study also did not differentiate between regular and decaf. On the other hand, the study did not show how coffee lowered the risk although it has been found to be efficient in reducing estrogen levels.

It is estimated that approximately 54,870 women may contract the disease this year, which could lead to 10, 170 deaths. The finding of the study validates earlier research works that showed coffee may be beneficial in decreasing endometrial cancer with additional research still needed to affirm the link between endometrial cancer and Coffee.

No specific causes have been attributed to endometrial cancer although, researchers maintain hormonal imbalances as well as diabetes and obesity as some of the probable factors that may accelerate the risk of getting the disease.

Researchers in the study assessed the link between 84 foods and nutrients with a view of ascertaining the risk to endometrial cancer. Some of the foods that the study found could be associated with disease include total fat, phosphorus, carbohydrates as well as yogurt, butter and potatoes.

This is great information. While there’s no cause and effect realized from this study, the results are still valuable.

So, if you’re a woman and a coffee lover who isn’t too sensitive to the caffeine content of multiple cups — drink up! You may be reducing your cancer risks while you enjoy your morning joe!

http://www.worldtechtoday.com/four-cups-coffee-daily-decreases-endometrial-cancer-18-women/19089

Red wine the newest fat burner?

senseofsmellFoodFacts.com thinks we all get excited when we hear that a food or beverage we feel somewhat guilty about is shown to have actual health benefits. Really, what’ s better than finding out that we really should be eating chocolate?

So what if you heard that red wine can burn fat? (Really, it’s red grapes and all products from them, including wine — but we’ll go with the wine — in moderation, of course.)

The latest research discovering the benefits of red wine was recently published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. The study, conducted by scientists working together at the University of Florida and the University of Nebraska, has revealed beneficial effects from many products of dark red grapes.

The new findings suggest that consuming dark colored grapes – whether in wine, grape juice, or straight off the vine – could help people manage metabolic disorders related to obesity, such as the accumulation of fat in the liver and the regulation of blood sugar. Of course, the benefits of eating or drinking grape products only appear when taken in moderation.

“We did not expect, and we did not find, these compounds to improve body weight,” said Neil Shay bluntly, a biochemist and molecular biologist at Oregon State University who formed part of the research team. However, “if we could develop a dietary strategy for reducing the harmful accumulation of fat in the liver, using common foods like grapes, then it would be good news,” he added.

In the study, lab-grown human liver and fat cells were exposed to four natural chemicals found in Muscadine grapes. Muscadine grapes are native to the southeastern United States, and are one of the deep red varieties. One of the chemicals in the experiment, ellagic acid, was observed to dramatically slow the growth of existing fat cells, and deter the growth of new fat cells. It also promoted the metabolism of fatty acids found in liver cells.

Another trial conducted by the researchers involved feeding diets supplemented by Pinot noir grape extracts to obese mice. A control group of mice with a normal diet of 10 percent fat was compared to other groups fed an unhealthy diet of 60 percent fat. Over a period of 10 weeks, the mice with the high-fat diet developed fatty liver and signs of diabetes, symptoms also commonly observed in overweight or sedentary humans.

However, some of the overweight mice were also fed the Pinot noir grape extracts. These groups were observed to have a reduced accumulation of fat in their livers, as well as lower blood sugar than other mice fed on the same high-fat diet. In fact, the grape extracts helped some mice achieve the same blood sugar levels as mice fed on the normal diet.

Red wine has been linked to many other health benefits, including fighting cancer and reducing memory loss, especially in the elderly. However, Shay does not want people to think that his intention is to replace medications. “We are trying to validate the specific contributions of certain foods for health benefits,” he said. “If you’re out food shopping, and if you know a certain kind of fruit is good for a health condition you have, wouldn’t you want to buy that fruit?”

We’ve known for awhile that red wine in moderation can offer a variety of health benefits. This new information gives us another great reason to enjoy a glass with a great, healthy meal. We’ll enjoy it even more knowing we may be doing more for our bodies than we originally thought!

http://natmonitor.com/2015/02/08/best-diet-ever-drinking-red-wine-burns-fat-study-shows/

Another holiday, another new latte from Dunkin. The White Chocolate Raspberry Latte right in time for Valentine’s Day

1387790365401 (1)Valentine’s Day is coming up in a little over a week. As we make plans to show our love to the significant people in our lives, plan special Valentine’s dinners and perhaps even buy a special Valentine’s gift, we can be pretty positive that we’re going to see some special Valentine’s food products and beverages being offered up during this season of the heart. A little love in a cup, anyone?

Dunkin Donuts thinks they’ve got you covered this season with the White Chocolate Raspberry Latte. We’ll admit it, the name alone kind of puts us off a little because honestly we’re not expecting to find actual white chocolate and raspberries in there. We could be wrong, though, so before we pass judgement we thought it best to take a closer look.

Here are the nutrition facts for the medium White Chocolate Raspberry Latte (the most commonly sold size at Dunkin):

Calories:                    350
Fat:                            9 grams
Saturated Fat:          5 grams
Sugar:                       53 grams

You read that right — 53 grams of sugar in a 16 ounce cup. To put it in better perspective for you, a medium White Chocolate Raspberry Latte contains a little over 13 teaspoons of sugar.

Let’s see if the ingredients are any better:

Milk; Brewed Espresso Coffee; White Chocolate Raspberry Flavored Swirl Syrup: Sweetened Condensed Milk (Milk, Sugar), Sugar, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Water, Natural and Artificial Flavors, Potassium Sorbate (Preservative), Salt; Heart Sprinkle Topping: Sugar, Rice Flour, Vegetable Oil (Palm, Palm Kernel), Corn Starch, Gum Arabic, Cellulose Gum, Confectioner’s Glaze, Carrageenan, Titanium Dioxide (Color), Red 40, Yellow 6, Soy Lecithin, Red 3, Artificial Flavor.

Yep … we called it. FoodFacts.com couldn’t find any white chocolate or raspberry in that list. Guess that’s what the natural and artificial flavors are for. There are plenty of other unappealing ingredients here.

Sorry Dunkin, the White Chocolate Raspberry Latte won’t be warming our hearts this Valentine’s Day.

http://www.dunkindonuts.com/content/dunkindonuts/en/menu/beverages/hotbeverages/specialitycoffee/latte.html?DRP_DAIRY=Whole%20Milk&DRP_SWEET=None&DRP_SIZE=Medium&DRP_FLAVOR=White%20Chocolate%20Raspberry

Eat well, be happy

Diet-and-Mental-Health-300x245We’re all aware that the stigma surrounding mental health issues is beginning to dissipate. As it becomes more common for those affected to seek help and experience varying levels of relief and the science surrounding those issues has become more solid, FoodFacts.com knows that we’re definitely in better condition than we were thirty years ago. But the reasons the issues exist and finding effective treatment can sometimes remain elusive. A new study is showing that some of those answers have always been as close as our kitchen tables.

Published in The Lancet Psychiatry, leading academics state that as with a range of medical conditions, psychiatry and public health should now recognise and embrace diet and nutrition as key determinants of mental health.

Lead author, Dr Jerome Sarris from the University of Melbourne and a member of the International Society for Nutritional Psychiatry Research (ISNPR), said psychiatry is at a critical stage, with the current medically-focused model having achieved only modest benefits in addressing the global burden of poor mental health.

“While the determinants of mental health are complex, the emerging and compelling evidence for nutrition as a key factor in the high prevalence and incidence of mental disorders suggests that nutrition is as important to psychiatry as it is to cardiology, endocrinology and gastroenterology,” Dr Sarris said.

“In the last few years, significant links have been established between nutritional quality and mental health. Scientifically rigorous studies have made important contributions to our understanding of the role of nutrition in mental health,” he said.

Findings of the review revealed that in addition to dietary improvement, evidence now supports the contention that nutrient-based prescription has the potential to assist in the management of mental disorders at the individual and population level.

Studies show that many of these nutrients have a clear link to brain health, including omega-3s, B vitamins (particularly folate and B12), choline, iron, zinc, magnesium, S-adenosyl methionine (SAMe), vitamin D, and amino acids.

“While we advocate for these to be consumed in the diet where possible, additional select prescription of these as nutraceuticals (nutrient supplements) may also be justified,” Dr Sarris said.

Associate Professor Felice Jacka, a Principal Research Fellow from Deakin University and president of the ISNPR noted that many studies have shown associations between healthy dietary patterns and a reduced prevalence of and risk for depression and suicide across cultures and age groups.

“Maternal and early-life nutrition is also emerging as a factor in mental health outcomes in children, while severe deficiencies in some essential nutrients during critical developmental periods have long been implicated in the development of both depressive and psychotic disorders,” she said.

A systematic review published in late 2014 has also confirmed a relationship between ‘unhealthy’ dietary patterns and poorer mental health in children and adolescents. Given the early age of onset for depression and anxiety, these data point to dietary improvement as a way of preventing the initial incidence of common mental disorders.

Dr Sarris, an executive member of the ISNPR, believes that it is time to advocate for a more integrative approach to psychiatry, with diet and nutrition as key elements.

“It is time for clinicians to consider diet and additional nutrients as part of the treating package to manage the enormous burden of mental ill health,” he said.

There have been studies conducted regarding the effect of junk food consumption on mental health. We know that eating well provides our bodies with the necessary fuel to function optimally. So we’re not surprised by these findings. We’d love to see this news on our televisions and on the web being broadcast loud and clear to the masses. Until then, let’s all share our knowledge and help people understand that healthy food is a necessary component to good mental health.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/01/150129104217.htm

Vitamin water … too much of a good thing?

main-vitamin-enhanced-drinks-may-be-harming-your-health-study-findsWe hear all the time that most of us aren’t getting the vitamins our bodies need to keep us healthy. So it’s no surprise that vitamin water has been such a big consumer hit. We’re going to drink water anyway — why not include some extra vitamins while we’re doing it? It’s good for us.

A study published in Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism finds that it may be just the opposite.

Researchers analyzed 46 beverages, with and without added sugar, and found many “contained vitamins B6, B12, niacin and vitamin C in quantities ‘well in excess’ of the average daily requirements for young adults,” the New York Times reports.

These juices, waters, and sports drinks entice consumers with mood- or performance-enhancing benefits as well as immune system boosts, but the added nutrients are unnecessary and potentially harmful; for example, a 2012 study published in the Cochrane Database found that heart disease patients treated with folic acid and B12 had higher mortality and cancer rates.

Furthermore, a 2012 nationwide study conducted by the National Institutes of Health found that the most common vitamins added to these beverages are already plentiful in the average person’s diet, between the foods we eat and the supplements we take. Conversely, the vitamin niacin (naturally found in mushrooms, fish and avocados) is difficult to ingest in large quantities, but is found in excess within a single bottle of “formula 50” Vitaminwater, the New York Times reports—it contains 120% of the daily recommended value.

“You couldn’t possibly get that much from any natural foods,” Dr. Tarasuk told the New York Times. “That’s concerning to me as a nutrition scientist because we don’t know what the effects of chronic exposure may be. With these products, we’ve embarked on a national experiment.”

Most folks we know are taking vitamin supplements. They’re also trying to eat a healthy, balanced diet consistently. FoodFacts.com is also aware that most in our community conscientiously avoid most processed foods that are devoid of nutritional value. Because of these significant lifestyle practices, the addition of vitamin water to an already healthy diet may in fact be too much of a good thing. Whatever your beverage choices are, make them carefully and consciously.

http://www.mensfitness.com/nutrition/what-to-drink/vitamin-enhanced-drinks-may-be-harming-your-health-study-finds

Ancient grains are good for you. What about new Cheerios Ancient Grains cereal?

CAGNoShadowAncient grains have been big news in the last few years. Grains like Quinoa, Spelt, Amaranth and Kamut have become enormously popular — and with good reason. They’re healthy for us and they have distinct flavors that add so much to a number of different dishes. We’ve adopted ancient grains into our diets with tremendous ease. Quinoa has become enormously popular — it’s actually trendy. And that’s great news, not just for our taste buds, but for our healthy lifestyles as well.

Now Cheerios has gotten on the ancient grains bandwagon. So are Ancient Grains Cheerios as good for you as the grains from which they’re made? Let’s find out. Here are the nutrition facts for one ¾ cup serving of the new cereal:

Calories:               110
Fat:                        2 grams
Sugar:                   5 grams

Here’s the ingredient list:

Whole Grain Oats, Cluster (whole grain oats, sugar, whole grain quinoa, corn syrup, crisp rice (rice flour, sugar, barley malt extract, salt), canola oil, molasses, natural flavor, salt, vitamin E (mixed tocopherols) added to preserve freshness, sugar, Kamut Brand Khorasan Wheat, Spelt, Corn Starch, Refiner’s Syrup, Salt, Maple Syrup,Tripotassium Phosphate, Color Added, Natural Flavor, Vitamin E (mixed tocopherols) Added to Preserve Freshness. Vitamins and Minerals: Calcium Carbonate, Iron and Zinc (mineral nutrients), Vitamin C (sodium ascorbate), A B Vitamin (niacinamide), Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine hydrocloride), Vitamin B2 (riboflavin), Vitamin B1 (thiamin mononitrate), Vitamin A (palmitate), A B Vitamin (folic acid), Vitamin B12, Vitamin D3.

So what’s the verdict here?

Ancient Grains Cheerios aren’t terrible. There are countless cereals we could find with tremendously offending nutrition facts and inedible ingredient lists. We really don’t want to say this new Cheerios offering is terrible. But we do have a couple of problems — those would be natural flavor and added colors (which are undefined in the list).

FoodFacts.com isn’t a fan of this one. While it’s not awful, it’s not great either. We can find other cereals featuring ancient grains that leave out the things we don’t like. So we’ll stick with those.

http://www.cheerios.com/en/Products/Ancient%20Grains.aspx