Category Archives: fast food

A trend taken too far … the Burger King Red Velvet Oreo Shake

sweetsEvery few years tremendous amounts of attention turn to something that’s existed under the radar for quite a while. This happens in the world of food all the time. And for the past few years all eyes have turned to red velvet cake. With its roots in southern cooking, red velvet cake isn’t a new culinary discovery. It’s been around since World War II. New York’s famous hotel, the Waldorf-Astoria, claims to have originated the recipe while those from the south will tell you that’s not true and that recipe has been in their family forever. It’s a great cake, moist and uniquely flavorful. But it was never “a thing.”

It is now though. Red Velvet is one of those trends that really caught on and won’t die. There’s red velvet everything, everywhere. We’ve even got Red Velvet Oreos.

And now Burger King has introduced the Red Velvet Oreo Shake. isn’t very excited about this latest introduction. We’re used to the idea that whenever we find the word “red” in a fast food menu item name, we’re going to find artificial colors in the ingredient list. And if they’re using artificial colors in a recipe, we’re pretty positive that the rest of the list will be tainted by a large number of controversial ingredients. It’s almost as though they figure the artificial coloring is already in there, why bother caring about the quality of the remainder of the ingredients. We thought we’d investigate to see if our theory holds up.

Nutrition Facts (16 ou. size)
Calories:                         630
Fat:                                 17 grams
Saturated Fat:              10 grams
Sugar:                            90 grams

We will acknowledge that the shake is listed as a “Sweet” on the website, inferring that you should order this to enjoy as a dessert after your meal. So, for instance, after you’ve eaten a Whopper with fries which cost you about 1,000 calories and 60 grams of fat, you should add an extra 630 calories and 17 grams of fat because you just love red velvet everything. And let’s not forget the almost 23 TEASPOONS OF SUGAR in a 16 oz. serving!!!!!! WOW.

Let’s see how Burger King built the Red Velvet Oreo Shake:

SOFT SERVE/SHAKE MIX: Milk fat and Nonfat Milk, Sugar, Sweet Whey, Corn Syrup, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Propylene Glycol Monoesters, Natural and Artificial Vanilla Flavor, Mono & Diglycerides, Guar Gum, Disodium Phosphate, Sodium Citrate, Cellulose Gum, Carrageenan. CONTAINS: MILK, RED VELVET SHAKE SYRUP: Sugar, Water, Cocoa Processed with Alkali, Contains 2% or less of: natural flavors, artificial color (Red 40), Potassium Sorbate (preservative), Salt, Xanthan Gum, Lactic Acid.

There’s nothing good about this ingredient list. We start off with the shake mix that contains all sorts of things we try very hard to stay away from. Then they add the Red Velvet Shake Syrup which contains more ingredients we try very hard to stay away from. Put it all together and you’ve got a pretty big mess (which, by the way, doesn’t have a thing to do with Oreos at all.)

Next time we’re craving red velvet, we’re getting ready to bake a cake (from a recipe that doesn’t include artificial food coloring) and spending the time required to prepare it ourselves. We’re out on this one. Thanks anyway.

More bacon … this time from Taco Bell with the Bacon Club Chalupa

pdp-Bacon-Club-Chalupa-2015Did you know that a chalupa is described as a tostada platter? It is a Mexican specialty of south-central Mexico, including the states of Puebla,Guerrero and Oaxaca. Chalupas nad is made by pressing a thin layer of masa dough around the outside of a small mold, in the process creating a concave container resembling the boat of the same name, and then deep frying the result to produce crisp, shallow corn cups.

If you’re a Taco Bell fan, odds are you didn’t know that because the Taco Bell Chalupa doesn’t remotely resemble that description. And their Bacon Club Chalupa doesn’t resemble anything remotely Mexican.

Welcome the Bacon Club Chalupa back to the menu. Bacon. Again. We’ve been reporting on waaaay too many fast food items featuring bacon. We’re guessing this is supposed to be like a Mexican club sandwich. looked a little further into it and discovered the following significant information:

Nutrition Facts:
Calories:                  470
Fat:                           29 grams
Saturated Fat:        6 grams
Sodium :                 870 mg

Fat and salt are abundant here. While good old American club sandwiches sound like fresh, healthy meal choices when you’re sitting in a diner, they most often contain the same abundance of fat and salt. Mimicking them in a Mexican reincarnation certainly doesn’t do anyone any favors.
Here’s what it takes to make a Bacon Club Chalupa:

Chalupa Shell: Enriched wheat flour, malted barley flour, water, soybean oil, yeast, sugar, vital wheat gluten, contains 1% or less of, salt, corn syrup solids, oat fiber, dough conditioners (sodium stearoyl lactylate, mono and di-glycerides), baking powder, soy protein isolate, enzymes, calcium propionate (P). Prepared in canola oil. Contains: Wheat, Soy, Fire Grilled Chicken: Chicken, water, seasoning (maltodextrin, dried garlic, salt, spices, natural flavor, carrageenan, dried onion, disodium inosinate & guanylate, citric acid, caramel color (C), garlic powder, onion powder), modified food starch, sodium phosphates, salt., Tomatoes: Fresh tomatoes., Avocado Ranch Sauce: Soybean oil, buttermilk, water, avocado, vinegar, enzyme modified egg yolk, garlic juice, sugar, salt, garlic powder, onion powder, spices, natural flavor, lactic acid, lemon and lime juice concentrate, disodium inosinate, potassium sorbate and sodium benzoate (P), propylene glycol alginate, xanthan gum, calcium disodium EDTA (PF), blue 1 (C). Contains: Milk, Eggs, Bacon: Bacon cured with water, salt, sugar, sodium phosphates, sodium erythorbate, flavor (including smoke flavor), sodum nitrite (P)., Iceberg Lettuce: Fresh iceberg lettuce, Three Cheese Blend: Part skim mozzerella cheese, cheddar cheese, Monterey pepper jack cheeese (cultured pasteurized milk, salt, enzymes, water, cream, sodium citrate, jalapeno peppers, salt, sodium phosphate, lactic acid, sorbic Acid (P)), anti-caking agent. Contains: Milk

With far too many controversial ingredients, this option from Taco Bell isn’t the best idea for anyone. We’d really love to see Taco Bell rethink their some of their product introductions. Perhaps if they concentrated more on better ingredients and staying true to their original theme, we’d find better options here. This just isn’t appealing. Sorry, Taco Bell.

How about some Baconater Fries to go with that Baconater?

Wendy's_logo_2012.svgWho knows, maybe someday Wendy’s will find a way to offer a Baconater Coke. Or maybe a Baconater Frosty.

Seriously, Wendy’s is doubling down on the bacon with the introduction of Baconater Fries. This can’t be good folks. It doesn’t take the database to figure that out. All we need to do is read the name and we can make certain assumptions. Too much fat. Too much salt. Nasty ingredients. Let’s see if we’re right.

Nutrition Facts:
Calories:                          490
Fat:                                   28 grams
Saturated Fat:                9 grams
Sodium:                          550 mg

These fries pack on the calories, fat and sodium. And they’re simply a meal component, not a meal by themselves. Based on that idea alone, these fries are a bad idea.

So what’s inside these French fries slathered in cheese sauce and bacon?

Cheddar Cheese Sauce: Water, Cheddar Cheese (pasteurized milk, cheese culture, salt, enzymes), Milk, Cream Cheese Spread (pasteurized milk and cream, cheese culture, salt, carob bean gum), Modified Cornstarch, Non Fat Dry Milk, Soybean Oil, Palm Oil, Whey, Sodium Phosphate, Cream, Cheese Culture, Milk Fat, Parmesan Cheese (pasteurized part-skim milk, cheese cultures, salt, enzyme), Butter, Salt And Sea Salt, Sodium Alginate, Carob Bean Gum, Mono & Diglycerides, Annatto And Apocarotenal (for color), Lactic Acid. CONTAINS: MILK. Natural-Cut Fries: Potatoes, Vegetable Oil (contains one or more of the following oils: canola, soybean, cottonseed, sunflower, corn), Dextrose, Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate (to maintain natural color). Cooked in Soybean Oil, Vegetable Oil (may contain one or more of the following: canola, corn, cottonseed), Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Natural Flavor, Citric Acid (preservative), Dimethylpolysiloxane (anti-foaming agent). Cooked in the same oil as menu items that contain Wheat, Egg, and Fish (where available). Seasoned with Sea Salt. Cheddar Cheese, Shredded: Cultured Pasteurized Milk, Salt, Enzymes, Annatto Color, Potato Starch and Powdered Cellulose (to prevent caking), Natamycin (natural mold inhibitor). CONTAINS: MILK. Applewood Smoked Bacon: Pork Cured With: Water, Salt, Sugar, Sodium Phosphates, Sodium Eryhthobate, Sodium Nitrite.

Not the recipe for french fries we like to see. That’s an awful lot of ingredients for one order of fries. Baconater French Fries aren’t a healthy choice. If you pair them up with a Baconater Burger, you’ve got quite a recipe for unhealthy effects happening. It’s definitely not something we’ll be eating.

Cap’n Crunch Berries Delights at Taco Bell … Where do they come up with this stuff anyway?

pdp-capt-crunch-delightsThey really don’t look delightful to us here at And for the life of us we really can’t imagine why anyone thought these limited edition snack bites were a good idea. The idea of a pastry filled with sweet milk icing and then rolled in crushed Cap’n Crunch Berries cereal seems to be a stretch for the fast food imagination. And not necessarily a welcome one, either.

Cap’n Crunch Berries Delights look to be a few inches in diameter each and come in packs of 2, 4 and 12. They’re also a really vibrant shade of red when you open them up. That never leaves us feeling particularly comfortable about eating something. Honestly, they look like overly sweet, highly processed small food disasters. Let’s take a look inside:

Nutrition Facts:
Calories:                                    330 (4 bites)
Fat:                                             22 grams
Saturated Fat:                          4.5 grams
Sugars:                                      14 grams

Ingredients: Dough and filling: Sugar, nonfat milk, margarine, evaporated milk, sweetened condensed milk, enriched bleached wheat flour, water, vegetable shortening (palm and soybean oils), eggs, yeast, dough conditioners (mono- and diglycerides, sodium alginate, sodium stearoyl lactylate), natural flavors, salt, Red 40 (C), enzyme. Cereal Coating: Corn flour, sugar, oat flour, brown sugar, coconut oil, salt, sodium nitrate, natural and artificial flavor, strawberry juice concentrate, malic acid, reduced iron, niacinamide, zinc oxide, vitamin B2 (riboflavin), BHT (P), vitamin B6 (pyridoxine hydrochloride), vitamin B1 (thiamin mononitrate), folic acid, yellow 5 & 6 (C), Red 40 (C), Blue 1 (C). Contains: Wheat, Milk, Eggs, Soy

There’s really no good reason to eat these. They’re a too-bright, neon color for a reason. They serve no nutritional purpose. They don’t even appear to be an actual dessert. Just small balls of sugar and controversial ingredients.

While we honestly don’t understand the attraction here, if you’re ever in a Taco Bell and you feel yourself drawn to the Cap’n Crunch Berry Delights, we hope you’ll remember this blog post and stay far away!

Are full-service restaurants healthier choices than fast food chains? Not really.

Spanish_Eating_Out_070615Here at we spend a lot of time talking about how unhealthy fast food restaurants are. We talk about calorie and fat levels. We’re continually shocked by the amount of sodium packed into one hamburger. And we always want to stay far away from ingredient lists that could possibly double as science experiments.

Many people assume that any food that isn’t fast food has to be better for you. We’ll admit that it’s a logical assumption. A full-service restaurant has an actual chef. The food doesn’t arrive already prepared and frozen. It’s prepared in a real kitchen, and it’s fresh. That has to make a difference, right? Read on.

When Americans go out to eat, either at a fast-food outlet or a full-service restaurant, they consume, on average, about 200 more calories a day than when they stay home for meals, a new study reports. They also take in more fat, saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium than those who prepare and eat their meals at home.

These are the findings of University of Illinois kinesiology and community health professor Ruopeng An, who analyzed eight years of nationally representative data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which is conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics. An looked at 2003-10 data collected from 18,098 adults living in the U.S.

His analysis, reported in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, revealed that eating at a restaurant is comparable to — or in some cases less healthy than — eating at a fast-food outlet. While people who eat at restaurants tend to take in more healthy nutrients — including certain vitamins, potassium and omega-3 fatty acids — than those who eat at home or at a fast-food outlet, the restaurant diners also consume substantially more sodium and cholesterol — two nutrients that Americans generally eat in excess, even at home.

“People who ate at full-service restaurants consumed significantly more cholesterol per day than people who ate at home,” An said. “This extra intake of cholesterol, about 58 milligrams per day, accounts for 20 percent of the recommended upper bound of total cholesterol intake of 300 milligrams per day.”

Those who ate at fast-food outlets also took in extra cholesterol, but only about 10 milligrams more than those who ate at home.
Fast-food and restaurant diners consumed about 10 grams more total fat, and 3.49 grams and 2.46 grams, respectively, more saturated fat than those who dined at home.

“The American Heart Association recommends limiting the amount of saturated fats one eats to less than 5 to 6 percent of one’s total daily calories,” An said. “That means that if one needs about 2,000 calories a day, less than 120 calories, or 13 grams, should come from saturated fats.”

Eating at a fast-food outlet adds about 300 milligrams of sodium to one’s daily intake, and restaurant dining boosts sodium intake by 412 milligrams per day, on average, An said. Recommendations for sodium intake vary between 1,500 and 2,300 milligrams per day, but Americans already consume more than 3,100 milligrams of sodium at home, he found.

“The additional sodium is even more worrisome because the average daily sodium intake among Americans is already so far above the recommended upper limit, posing a significant public health concern, such as hypertension and heart disease,” he said.

“These findings reveal that eating at a full-service restaurant is not necessarily healthier than eating at a fast-food outlet,” An said. “In fact, you may be at higher risk of overeating in a full-service restaurant than when eating fast-food. My advice to those hoping to consume a healthy diet and not overeat is that it is healthier to prepare your own foods, and to avoid eating outside the home whenever possible.”

The conclusion emphasizes what has been saying for years. Fresh, whole foods prepared in your own home kitchen are the healthiest option for all of us. As we become busier and busier in a world that becomes increasingly more sophisticated and complicated, it is so important for us all to carve out time every day focusing on ourselves. We’ve already got the hang of that in some areas. Folks who go to the gym, for instance, do that pretty successfully. But we’ve got to commit to time to prepare meals, as well. We’ll all be better off for the effort.

The Extra Long Pulled Pork Sandwich … the latest “less bad” option from Burger King

urlIn a sea of really bad food choices, any fast food menu option that boasts mostly reasonable nutrition facts and a mostly reasonable ingredient list quickly become a stand out. We were surprised to find that Burger King’s latest, the Extra Long Pulled Pork Sandwich is that kind of menu item. While isn’t going to tell our community that this sandwich is finally the healthy option you’ve been waiting for from Burger King, we can tell you that it’s “less bad” and, in a pinch, that can be important. Let’s take a look.

Nutrition Facts:

Calories:                       370
Fat:                                8 grams
Saturated Fat:             2.5 grams
Sodium:                       1290 grams

The only thing that goes overboard here is the sodium – and it’s not small. This is one salty sandwich and it certainly doesn’t leave much room to season the rest of your food for the day. But calorie and fat content are very reasonable.

PORK PULLED WITH SAUCE, FULLY COOKED, SMOKED: Pork, Barbeque Sauce (Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Tomato Paste, Distilled Vinegar, Sugar, Salt, Modified Food Starch, Mustard (Water, Vinegar, Mustard Bran, Salt), Natural Smoke Flavor, Tamarind Extract, Sodium Benzoate and Potassium Sorbate (Preservatives), Caramel Color, Spices, Ground Paprika, Malic Acid, Tomato Powder, Citric Acid, Garlic Powder, Onion Powder). SPECIALTY BUNS: Enriched wheat flour [flour, malted barley flour, reduced iron, niacin, thiamin mononitrate (Vitamin B1), riboflavin (vitamin B2), folic acid], water, high fructose corn syrup, sesame seeds, yeast, soybean oil, salt, wheat gluten, calcium sulfate, calcium propionate (preservative), flaxseeds, mono- and diglycerides, datem, citric acid, potassium iodate, soy lecithin. CONTAINS: WHEAT AND SOY, Onions, Pickles

This certainly isn’t the best ingredient list we’ve ever seen. To be honest though, there are plenty of fast food options that are much, much worse. While we’re not a fan, we do need to acknowledge that most burgers contain plenty more than four controversial ingredients.

So, what’s the verdict? We don’t think this should be on anyone’s “must-eat” list. If there are special circumstances however — say you’re on the road and the only restaurant options for the next 200 miles happen to be fast food, Burger King’s new Extra Long Pulled Pork Sandwich is “less bad” than a Whopper. That’s something, at least.

Papa John’s gets onboard, committing to the removal of artificial ingredients by the end of 2016

Papa-JohnsIn an effort to respond to consumer demand and position Papa John’s as a leader in the fast-casual restaurant business, the chain has followed others and committed to the removal of artificial ingredients by the end of next year. is happy to see yet another power-house brand listening to consumer voices and acting in the best interest of the folks that keep their business thriving.

Papa John’s International Inc. has long used the slogan “Better Ingredients. Better Pizza.”

With a growing number of restaurant chains making public commitments to the quality of their food, the nation’s third largest pizza chain has released a list of 14 ingredients it has committed to remove from its menu items by the end of 2016. It also launched a marketing campaign that compares its ingredient list to Panera Bread and Chipotle Mexican Grill.

Papa John’s launched a website this week that lists itself, Panera and Chipotle as “leading clean ingredient brands.” It tallies the ingredients that it doesn’t have on its menu compared with the two fast-casual chains, which lead the industry in terms of reputation for sourcing ingredients responsibly.

Papa John’s also ran an ad in USA Today Thursday that made the same comparison. The ad is in the form of “A letter to the moms and dads of America,” from Papa John’s founder, chairman, president and CEO John Schnatter.

“I have a question for you: What’s your child’s favorite food?” it begins.

“I bet a lot of you would answer ‘pizza,’ right?

“We all love having those Friday night family pizza dinners. But you’re also concerned that your children are eating balanced meals and foods full of good, quality ingredients.

“Well, I’m a parent too (and recently a grandparent). Let me be clear about this. I’m not going to serve people in our restaurants things I would not serve my family at home.”

The ingredients to be removed include artificial flavors and colors, corn syrup and corn syrup solids, hydrolyzed soy protein and corn protein, and sodium benzoate.

Papa John’s has already removed trans fats, monosodium glutamate, and the preservatives BHA and BHT from its menu.

Panera Bread Co. launched a similar campaign last week highlighting “food as it should be,” which included newspaper advertisements in the form of a letter from founder, chairman and CEO Ron Shaich, who urged customers to “Demand transparency and cleaner menus.”

Chipotle has long used the tagline “Food With Integrity” to describe its sourcing philosophy, which includes purchasing meat from animals that are not treated with antibiotics. Earlier this year, it also said it would remove ingredients made from genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, from its food.

Other large restaurant chains have also recently made claims or commitments regarding their food sourcing.

Last year, Chick-fil-A Inc. committed to removing chicken treated with antibiotics within the next five years, and in March, McDonald’s committed to removing chicken treated with antibiotics that are also used to treat humans within the next two years. McDonald’s, the country’s largest restaurant chain, also said it would work to curb antibiotic use in other foods, including beef and pork, and to offer in its kids’ Happy Meals low-fat milk and fat-free chocolate milk from cows that had not been treated with the growth hormone rBST.

Consumer sentiment … it just might be cleaning up the fast food and fast casual industry one chain at a time.

Burger King’s Fully Loaded Crossan’wich … not the best way to start your day

Croissanwich_Loaded_desktopYou’ll probably never see advocating for anyone to choose a fast food breakfast sandwich over an actual, prepared-at-home-in-your-own-kitchen breakfast. Unless and until the food world changes drastically, we remain firmly in the “avoid” camp. Still, we know that sometimes, even nutritionally conscious people end up in situations that present them with few choices. If you’re ever in one of those situations and somehow end up in the nearest Burger King, take the Fully Loaded Crossan’wich off your list of possibilities.

It’s that bad. Here’s what our investigation turned up:

Nutrition Facts:
Calories:                      640
Fat:                               42 grams
Saturated Fat:            16 grams
Sodium:                      1740 mg

This breakfast sandwich seriously resembles a burger. The nutrition facts are that bad. This is an excessive breakfast, even for fast food. Among bad choices, this sandwich is a bad choice. Let’s find out what’s really in there:
CROISSANT: Enriched Flour [Wheat Flour, Malted Barley Flour, Niacin, Reduced Iron, Thiamine Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid], Water, Margarine [Palm Oil, Water, Soybean Oil, Sugar, Soybean Lecithin with Mono- and Diglycerides added, Potassium Sorbate and Citric Acid (preservatives), Beta Carotene, Vitamin A Palmitate], High Fructose Corn Syrup, Yeast, Salt, Sweet Whey, Dough Conditioner [Calcium Sulfate, Diacetyl Tartaric Acid Ester of Monoglyceride (DATEM), Ammonium Sulfate, Enzymes, Ascorbic Acid, Azodicarbonamide], Calcium Propionate, Natural and Artificial Butter Flavor, Modified Cornstarch. HAM: Ham cured with: Water, Dextrose, Contains 2% or less of salt, sodium lactate, sodium phosphate, natural smoke flavoring, sodium diacetate, sodium erythorbate, sodium nitrite, coated with caramel coloring. MILD SAUSAGE: Pork, Salt, Spices, Corn Syrup Solids, Dextrose, Monosodium Glutamate, Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Grill Flavor (from Soybean Oil). THICK SLICED BACON: Cured with Water, Salt, Sugar, Sodium Phosphate, Sodium Erythorbate, Sodium Nitrite. EGG PATTY – FULLY COOKED: Whole Egg, Whey, Soybean Oil, Salt, Natural and Artificial Butter Flavor, Xanthan Gum, Citric Acide, Annatto (color). AMERICAN CHEESE (PASTEURIZED PROCESS): Cultured Milk, Water, Cream, Sodium Citrate, Salt, Sorbic Acid (Preservative), Sodium Phosphate, Artificial Color, Enzymes, Acetic Acid, Soy Lecithin.

Too many ingredients. Too many controversial ingredients. Too many calories. Too much fat. Too much saturated fat. Too much sodium.

Burger King needs to get its act together and begin to respond to consumer demand for healthier fast food. The Fully Loaded Crossan’wich is poised to take a shot at our health and well being. We think it needs to be disarmed.

Burger King’s A.1. Hearty Mozzarella Cheeseburger … a flame grilled fast food problem

A1_Hearty_Mozzarella_detailSome new fast food offerings are easy to identify as bad choices simply by their name. puts the new Burger King A.1. Hearty Mozzarella Cheeseburger squarely in that category. There’s very little way to imagine that this could be remotely passable as a “less bad” fast food option.

It gets worse when you read the description on their website: “Features two ¼ lb. savory flame-grilled beef patties, topped with thick-cut smoked bacon, melted Mozzarella cheese, fresh chopped lettuce, crisp cut onions, and featuring savory A.1.®Thick & Hearty sauce, all on a warm, toasted, brioche-style bun.” Bacon, mozzarella, A1 sauce, brioche style bun. could easily be reading: controversial ingredients, extra fat and calories, controversial ingredients, controversial ingredients.

Let’s find out what’s in there:

Nutrition Facts:
Calories:                      800
Fat:                               48 grams
Saturated Fat:            21 grams
Sodium:                      1420 mg.

That’s a lot of calories, fat, saturated fat and sodium for one burger. We didn’t even get to the fries yet – which will most certainly push the sodium content of this meal well over the daily recommended intake. It’s pretty bad.

What do the ingredients look like?

BRIOCHE-STYLE BUN: Unbleached Enriched Flour (Wheat Flour, Malted Barley Flour, Niacin, Reduced Iron, Thiamin Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Yeast, Dried Honey Blend (Cane Refinery Syrup and Honey), Soybean Oil, Contains 2% or less of each of the following: Salt, Wheat Gluten, Dextrose, Monocalcium Phosphate, Calcium Sulfate, Natural Flavors, Monoglycerides, Ascorbic Acid, Enzymes, Sunflower Oil, Vegetable Proteins, Wheat Maltodextrins, Calcium Phosphate, Wheat Dextrose, Corn Starch, Soy Lecithin, Soy Flour, Calcium propionate (to retard spoilage). HAMBURGER PATTIES : 100% USDA inspected Ground Beef (Fire-Grilled), THICK SLICED BACON: Cured with Water, Salt, Sugar, Sodium Phosphate, Sodium Erythorbate, Sodium Nitrite. MOZZARELLA CHEESE SLICED (PROCESSED): Cultured Milk, Skim Milk, Water, Cream, Whey, Sodium Citrate, Salt, Sorbic Acid (Preservative), Natural Flavor, Enzymes, Soy Lecithin, A.1.® STEAK SAUCE: Tomato Puree (Water, Tomato Paste), High Fructose Corn Syrup, Vinegar, Corn Syrup, Salt, Raisin Paste, Orange Puree, Spice, Xanthan Gum, Dried Onions, Dried Garlic, Caramel Color., Lettuce, Onion

While can understand that this new burger might sound good to some, we’re really unhappy with the nutrition facts and the ingredient list certainly leaves something to be desired.

It’s summertime. Get out and fire up a grill. Choose some healthy toppings for your burger. Change it up with turkey or chicken. You’ll be doing your body a healthy favor. We’re also positive it will taste a lot better, too.

Pretzels and eggs for breakfast

1432222288095We’ll admit it. really doesn’t get the allure of the pretzel roll. It’s obvious, though, that we’re in the minority on this issue. Everywhere you look, there’s a fast food or fast casual chain introducing a sandwich on a pretzel roll. We’ve actually even seen delis offering sandwiches on pretzel rolls. It’s a thing. And it looks like it’s a thing that’s here to stay.

Considering that statement, it makes perfect sense that Dunkin Donuts is now offering a breakfast sandwich on a pretzel roll. Kind of like having pretzels and eggs for breakfast. Sort of.

If the idea sounds appealing to you, we’re sure you want to know exactly what you’re eating before you decide to indulge. So let’s take a look inside the new Bacon, Egg and Cheese Pretzel Roll Sandwich from Dunkin.

Nutrition Facts:
Calories:                       400 calories
Fat:                                13 grams
Saturated Fat:              6 grams
Sodium:                        1110 mg

46% of your daily sodium in one sandwich. So it’s a little on the salty side. Other than that, it’s a pretty typical breakfast sandwich.

Pretzel Roll: Roll: Enriched Wheat Flour (Wheat Flour, Malted Barley Flour, Niacin, Iron, Thiamin Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid),Water, Sugar, Nonfat Dry Milk, Yeast, Palm Oil, Salt, Dough Conditioner (Wheat Flour, DATEM, Contains 2% or less of: Soybean Oil, Enzymes, Ascorbic Acid, L-Cysteine Hydrochloride, Azodicarbonamide), Wheat Gluten, Shelf Life Extender (Wheat Flour, Monoglycerides, Wheat Gluten, Corn Syrup Solids, Contains 2% or less of: Silicon Dioxide to prevent caking, Soybean Oil, Enzymes, Calcium Sulfate, Salt), Natural Pretzel Flavor (Glycerin, Natural Flavor, Water), Calcium Propionate (Preservative), Azodicarbonamide, Ascorbic Acid; Contains traces of Egg; Lye solution is applied as Surface Finishing Agent, Soy Lecithin added as a Processing Aid; Topping: Pretzel Salt; Fried Egg: Egg Whites, Water, Egg Yolks, Modified Corn Starch, Natural Sauteed Flavor (Soybean Oil, Medium Chain Triglycerides, Natural Flavor), Salt, Artificial Butter Flavor (Propylene Glycol, Artificial Flavor), Xanthan Gum, Citric Acid, Coarse Ground Black Pepper; Cheese: American Cheese (Milk, Cheese Cultures, Salt, Enzymes), Water, Dry Cream, Milkfat, Sodium Citrate, Salt, Sorbic Acid (Preservative), Annatto and Oleoresin Paprika Color (if colored), Soy Lecithin (non-sticking agent); Bacon: Pork, cured with: Water, Sugar, Salt, Sodium Phosphate, Smoke Flavoring, Sodium Erythorbate, Sodium Nitrite.

Maybe there’s a good reason that hasn’t been able to get behind the pretzel roll band wagon. Maybe we’re just really intuitive around here. That’s a pretty bad ingredient list.

We don’t want pretzels with our eggs.  Can you blame us?