Category Archives: Dairy

Starbucks gives non-dairy fans a reason to smile — coconut milk!

2D274907784499-starbucks.blocks_desktop_largeMore and more consumers are looking for non-dairy options for everything from their cereal to their coffee. And for some … soy milk has taken a back seat to other options they consider more healthful.  Coconut milk is becoming one of the favorite non-dairy options for so many. It tastes great and people are thrilled with the health benefits it offers.  While finding non-dairy options beyond soy milk has been a bit difficult for consumers, some forward-thinking coffee chains have been embracing the needs of the non-dairy consumer.   Starbucks is the latest chain to join the trend.

Starbucks announced it’s adding coconut milk to its menu starting later in February.

The coffee chain said customers have been asking for a non-dairy alternative to soy, and Starbucks chose coconut milk over almond milk because of fewer “allergen challenges,” according to a statement. But the brand’s latest option appears to have several additional benefits — including a potentially better cup of joe than other milk alternatives.

A Starbucks spokesperson told Today.com that more than 84,000 people voted that the brand should introduce another non-dairy alternative on its website, and it tested coconut milk in about 600 stores last year to see what customers thought.

Starbucks chose coconut milk because its “rich creaminess” tasted best with its coffee and espresso, the spokesperson added.

Alex Bernson, a barista for eight years who now writes for the Portland-based coffee website Sprudge, is no stranger to the alternative milk debate. He told Today.com that coconut milk is a good choice because it foams well — meaning you can have a real non-dairy cappuccino.

“Rice milk, you can’t steam at all. It gets hot but it doesn’t have any sort of foam,” said Bernson, who worked at several independent coffee shops. “Hemp doesn’t steam well and kind of tastes like milk that’s in the bottom of the bowl when you finish Lucky Charms.”

As for soy, Starbucks’ current only option for the non-dairy crowd, “it’s not the greatest,” Bernson said of the milk’s foaming abilities.

He questioned the mass market appeal of milks made from rice or hemp, for example, but noted coconut has already proven to be popular.

“There’s definitely been a coconut water craze in the last five years,” he said. “You see coconut oil used in lots of things, in holistic health and cooking.”

While soy has been a popular milk alternative for years, customers might be shifting away from soy milk for several reasons. Dana James, a nutritionist based in New York City, pointed out that it has more calories than milks made from nuts, like coconut.

“A cup of soy is 120 calories, versus a cup of coconut milk which can be anywhere from 40 to 60 calories,” James told Today.com. Aside from additional calories, soy has been a controversial product for some time.

“It’s believed that 95 percent of soy is genetically modified, and it really raises concern for people,” James said.

Research into soy’s role in breast cancer is conflicted, but doctors suggest soy, like everything else, is okay in moderation. But while nut allergies are a well-known concern, some people may also have trouble tolerating soy.

Starbucks will offer coconut milk in its stores starting February 17. Just like soy milk, the option will cost customers 60 cents.

Starbucks joins a few other coffee chains who are catering to the needs of the substantial dairy-free population with an option other than soy milk. For instance, you can already find almond milk at Dunkin Donuts. FoodFacts.com is thrilled that Starbucks is recognizing the health needs of non-dairy consumers everywhere!

http://www.today.com/food/starbucks-offer-coconut-milk-coffees-lattes-2D80476816

New evidence linking acne to diet

FoodFacts.com understands the problems acne causes for so many in our population. Most common in the teenage years, but reaching well into adulthood and middle age, so many people are affected by this condition which has negative consequences for self esteem and socialization.

A new study recently published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has shown evidence of a link between diet and acne, most specifically from high glycemic load diets and dairy products. In addition, it illustrates that nutrition therapy can play a major role in the treatment of acne.

Over 17 million people in the United States suffer from acne. It influences their quality of life and can be a cause of anxiety and depression. Since the 1800s, research linked diet to acne. Most especially, the consumption of chocolate, sugar and fats were associated with the skin condition. By the 1960s new studies began to separate diet from the condition. Recently, though, dermatologists and registered dieticians have begun to explore the relationship between diet and acne and have become interested in how medical nutritional therapy might change the treatment of acne.

The new study comes out of the New York Medical College and New York University’s Department of Nutrition, Food Studies and Public Health. The researchers conducted a literature review to look at evidence for the diet/acne relationship.

Using information from studies conducted between 1960 and 2012, they compiled data for various study characteristics that included design, participants, results and conclusions, to name a few. After this review, it was concluded that a high glycemic index diet as well as frequent dairy consumption are the strongest factors in the link between diet and acne. They were careful to note that the research reviewed did not illustrate that diet is a cause of acne, but that it may well influence or aggravate the condition.

The researchers are recommending that dermatologists and dieticians work together to design and conduct further research based on their findings. They are interested in discovering how these dietary findings are related to acne and want to learn how the development of dietary interventions may change the way acne is treated.

FoodFacts.com appreciates every possibility for the treatment of health concerns through diet. It’s always important to learn and understand how the foods we consume affect our health and how adjustments to our diet can lessen the need for powerful medications, leading to more natural solutions for many different conditions.

Read more here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/256658.php

For women, low-fat and non-fat dairy may be linked to developing coronary heart disease

FoodFacts.com has always been a proponent of consuming real foods. After the years we’ve spent developing our comprehensive database, it has become very apparent that low-fat, non-fat products can also contain the controversial ingredients we encourage our community to avoid. Manufacturers tend to make up for the reduction in fats with food additives that help them to mimic the tastes and textures of the original full-fat versions of these foods. Now, there appears to be another reason we should be avoiding low-fat or no-fat dairy products, especially if we’re female.

A new study out of the University of California in San Diego has illustrated the possibility that consuming low-fat or no fat dairy … like low-fat cheese or skim milk may increase the risk of developing coronary heart disease.

It was found that women who consume low-fat cheese (sometimes or often) were at a 132% increased risk for developing CHD (coronary heart disease) and a 48% increased risk if they consumed non-fat milk (either sometimes or often). This is when compared to those women who rarely or never consumed either food.

The research collected data from over 700 men and 1,000 women in a community of older adults. These participants were followed for about 16 years and tracked for fatal and non-fatal coronary heart disease. Those participants who developed CHD were more likely to be older men with a higher body mass index and total cholesterol level than those without the disease.

However, for the women studied, there was an association between the consumption of low-fat and no-fat dairy products and their risk for CHD. In fact, even after the researchers adjusted for age, BMI and cholesterol, the link was still apparent. The higher the consumption of low-fat cheese and non-fat milk among these women, the higher their risk for coronary heart disease.

The researchers noted that CHD is a preventable disease. In fact, patients who consume a plant-based diet after diagnosis have been known to either reverse the disease or stop its progression.

FoodFacts.com understands that real foods that exclude those labeled low-fat, non-fat, light, sugar-free are healthier options for the population. Actually processed foods that don’t carry those terms need to have their ingredient lists closely scanned as well. But with the information carried in this study, there are new reasons to carefully consider the consumption of low-fat/no-fat dairy products for these very specific, very important reasons.

http://www.foodconsumer.org/newsite/Nutrition/Food/dairy_products_coronary_heart_disease_0105130445.html

Early puberty epidemic may be linked to meat and dairy consumption

Children today are reaching puberty at far younger ages than ever before. FoodFacts.com understands that this has become a big concern for parents everywhere. One of the first questions being asked is how this early onset of physical maturity can affect their children’s health and well-being. There has been information that early puberty may be associated with cancers like prostate and breast cancer that are hormone-related. As often as questions are asked about why this has occurred in our society, the answers have been few and far between.

New research published in the Journal of Nutrition has linked the consumption of high levels of meat and dairy with the early onset of puberty. It goes further to suggest that eating more vegetable protein can, in fact, be associated with the late onset of puberty.

The study originated at the Department of Nutritional, Food and Consumer Sciences at Fulda University of Applied Sciences in Germany. Dietary records were provided from 112 participants for their children at 12 months old, 18 to 24 months old, three to four years old and then again at 5 to 6 years old. After the age of 6 and until the age of 13, the participants provided information regarding the onset of puberty in both boys and girls.

It was discovered that the children consuming more animal protein (meat and dairy) between the ages of 5 and 6 had an earlier onset of puberty. Those children who consumed a higher level of vegetable protein were more likely to experience a later onset.

The study took into consideration other factors that might be an influence on the age of the children entering puberty. Things like gender, how long they were breastfed, and parental education levels were factored into the results.

All developed countries have been experiencing the same phenomenon regarding the age at which children begin to physically mature. It’s certainly worth noting that all developed countries have higher levels of animal protein consumption.

There have been past studies that have linked early puberty with obesity, environmental chemicals and food additives. Certainly this new information fits in with the other factors that have been pointed out in the past. Parents who are concerned about this for their children may want to include more vegetable proteins in their diets early in life, while lowering meat and dairy consumption in addition to helping them avoid processed foods and encouraging them to exercise.

FoodFacts.com hopes that this information will help parents in our community to continue to make the healthiest choices possible for their families.

Read more:  http://www.foodconsumer.org/newsite/Nutrition/Food/meat_dairy_products_early_puberty_1020121044.html