Category Archives: controversial food additives

Burger King’s A.1. Hearty Mozzarella Cheeseburger … a flame grilled fast food problem

A1_Hearty_Mozzarella_detailSome new fast food offerings are easy to identify as bad choices simply by their name.
FoodFacts.com puts the new Burger King A.1. Hearty Mozzarella Cheeseburger squarely in that category. There’s very little way to imagine that this could be remotely passable as a “less bad” fast food option.

It gets worse when you read the description on their website: “Features two ¼ lb. savory flame-grilled beef patties, topped with thick-cut smoked bacon, melted Mozzarella cheese, fresh chopped lettuce, crisp cut onions, and featuring savory A.1.®Thick & Hearty sauce, all on a warm, toasted, brioche-style bun.” Bacon, mozzarella, A1 sauce, brioche style bun. FoodFacts.com could easily be reading: controversial ingredients, extra fat and calories, controversial ingredients, controversial ingredients.

Let’s find out what’s in there:

Nutrition Facts:
Calories:                      800
Fat:                               48 grams
Saturated Fat:            21 grams
Sodium:                      1420 mg.

That’s a lot of calories, fat, saturated fat and sodium for one burger. We didn’t even get to the fries yet – which will most certainly push the sodium content of this meal well over the daily recommended intake. It’s pretty bad.

What do the ingredients look like?

BRIOCHE-STYLE BUN: Unbleached Enriched Flour (Wheat Flour, Malted Barley Flour, Niacin, Reduced Iron, Thiamin Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Yeast, Dried Honey Blend (Cane Refinery Syrup and Honey), Soybean Oil, Contains 2% or less of each of the following: Salt, Wheat Gluten, Dextrose, Monocalcium Phosphate, Calcium Sulfate, Natural Flavors, Monoglycerides, Ascorbic Acid, Enzymes, Sunflower Oil, Vegetable Proteins, Wheat Maltodextrins, Calcium Phosphate, Wheat Dextrose, Corn Starch, Soy Lecithin, Soy Flour, Calcium propionate (to retard spoilage). HAMBURGER PATTIES : 100% USDA inspected Ground Beef (Fire-Grilled), THICK SLICED BACON: Cured with Water, Salt, Sugar, Sodium Phosphate, Sodium Erythorbate, Sodium Nitrite. MOZZARELLA CHEESE SLICED (PROCESSED): Cultured Milk, Skim Milk, Water, Cream, Whey, Sodium Citrate, Salt, Sorbic Acid (Preservative), Natural Flavor, Enzymes, Soy Lecithin, A.1.® STEAK SAUCE: Tomato Puree (Water, Tomato Paste), High Fructose Corn Syrup, Vinegar, Corn Syrup, Salt, Raisin Paste, Orange Puree, Spice, Xanthan Gum, Dried Onions, Dried Garlic, Caramel Color., Lettuce, Onion

While FoodFats.com can understand that this new burger might sound good to some, we’re really unhappy with the nutrition facts and the ingredient list certainly leaves something to be desired.

It’s summertime. Get out and fire up a grill. Choose some healthy toppings for your burger. Change it up with turkey or chicken. You’ll be doing your body a healthy favor. We’re also positive it will taste a lot better, too.

http://www.bk.com/menu-item/1-hearty-mozzarella-cheeseburger

Pretzels and eggs for breakfast

1432222288095We’ll admit it. FoodFacts.com really doesn’t get the allure of the pretzel roll. It’s obvious, though, that we’re in the minority on this issue. Everywhere you look, there’s a fast food or fast casual chain introducing a sandwich on a pretzel roll. We’ve actually even seen delis offering sandwiches on pretzel rolls. It’s a thing. And it looks like it’s a thing that’s here to stay.

Considering that statement, it makes perfect sense that Dunkin Donuts is now offering a breakfast sandwich on a pretzel roll. Kind of like having pretzels and eggs for breakfast. Sort of.

If the idea sounds appealing to you, we’re sure you want to know exactly what you’re eating before you decide to indulge. So let’s take a look inside the new Bacon, Egg and Cheese Pretzel Roll Sandwich from Dunkin.

Nutrition Facts:
Calories:                       400 calories
Fat:                                13 grams
Saturated Fat:              6 grams
Sodium:                        1110 mg

46% of your daily sodium in one sandwich. So it’s a little on the salty side. Other than that, it’s a pretty typical breakfast sandwich.

Pretzel Roll: Roll: Enriched Wheat Flour (Wheat Flour, Malted Barley Flour, Niacin, Iron, Thiamin Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid),Water, Sugar, Nonfat Dry Milk, Yeast, Palm Oil, Salt, Dough Conditioner (Wheat Flour, DATEM, Contains 2% or less of: Soybean Oil, Enzymes, Ascorbic Acid, L-Cysteine Hydrochloride, Azodicarbonamide), Wheat Gluten, Shelf Life Extender (Wheat Flour, Monoglycerides, Wheat Gluten, Corn Syrup Solids, Contains 2% or less of: Silicon Dioxide to prevent caking, Soybean Oil, Enzymes, Calcium Sulfate, Salt), Natural Pretzel Flavor (Glycerin, Natural Flavor, Water), Calcium Propionate (Preservative), Azodicarbonamide, Ascorbic Acid; Contains traces of Egg; Lye solution is applied as Surface Finishing Agent, Soy Lecithin added as a Processing Aid; Topping: Pretzel Salt; Fried Egg: Egg Whites, Water, Egg Yolks, Modified Corn Starch, Natural Sauteed Flavor (Soybean Oil, Medium Chain Triglycerides, Natural Flavor), Salt, Artificial Butter Flavor (Propylene Glycol, Artificial Flavor), Xanthan Gum, Citric Acid, Coarse Ground Black Pepper; Cheese: American Cheese (Milk, Cheese Cultures, Salt, Enzymes), Water, Dry Cream, Milkfat, Sodium Citrate, Salt, Sorbic Acid (Preservative), Annatto and Oleoresin Paprika Color (if colored), Soy Lecithin (non-sticking agent); Bacon: Pork, cured with: Water, Sugar, Salt, Sodium Phosphate, Smoke Flavoring, Sodium Erythorbate, Sodium Nitrite.

Maybe there’s a good reason that FoodFacts.com hasn’t been able to get behind the pretzel roll band wagon. Maybe we’re just really intuitive around here. That’s a pretty bad ingredient list.

We don’t want pretzels with our eggs.  Can you blame us?

 

http://www.dunkindonuts.com/dunkindonuts/en/menu/food/sandwiches/breakfastsandwiches/bacon_egg_cheese_pretzel.html

 

How about some cookies with that donut? Introducing the Chips Ahoy Creme Donut from Dunkin

Screen Shot 2015-06-08 at 3.22.47 PMWhat do you get when you cross Chips Ahoy cookies with a Dunkin Donut? Our immediate answer would be overkill. Maybe that’s just us. Honestly, the idea of a cookie flavored donut doesn’t leave us craving either the cookie or the donut. We get an overwhelming impression of too much sugar and too much dough.

In case you find yourself among the millions of consumers who won’t agree with us, we thought we should try to let you know what you’re getting yourself into with this one. Let’s take a closer look.

Nutrition Facts:

Calories:                       380
Fat:                                19 grams
Saturated Fat:             9 grams
Sugar:                           26 grams

Pretty typical donut nutrition facts. Plenty of sugar, fat and saturated fat. It’s important to keep nutrition facts in their proper perspective. FoodFacts.com didn’t expect to find fabulous nutrition facts for a donut. So there isn’t anything out of the ordinary here.

But what exactly makes the Chips Ahoy Creme Donut what it is? Here are the ingredients.

Donut: Enriched Unbleached Wheat Flour (Wheat Flour, Malted Barley Flour, Niacin, Iron as Ferrous Sulfate, Thiamin Mononitrate, Enzyme, Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Palm Oil, Water, Dextrose, Soybean Oil, Whey (a milk derivative), Skim Milk, Yeast, Contains less than 2% of the following: Salt, Leavening (Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate, Baking Soda), Defatted Soy Flour, Wheat Starch, Mono and Diglycerides, Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate, Cellulose Gum, Soy Lecithin, Guar Gum, Xanthan Gum, Artificial Flavor, Sodium Caseinate (a milk derivative), Enzyme, Colored with (Turmeric and Annatto Extracts, Beta Carotene), Eggs; Cookie Dough Flavored Filling: Sugar, Vegetable Shortening (Palm Oil), Water, Maltodextrin, Corn Syrup. Contains 2% or less of each of the following: Dextrose, Corn Starch, Molasses, Salt, Mono and Diglycerides, Natural Flavor, Polysorbate 60, Caramel Color, Soy Lecithin, Potassium Sorbate (Preservative), Sodium Propionate (Preservative), Agar, Propylene Glycol, Phosphoric Acid; Chocolate Icing: Sugar, Water, Cocoa, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Soybean Oil, Corn Syrup, Maltodextrin, Contains 2% or less of: Dextrose, Corn Starch, Partially Hydrogenated Soybean and/or Cottonseed Oil, Salt, Potassium Sorbate and Sodium Propionate (Preservatives), Soy Lecithin (Emulsifier), Agar, Artificial Flavor; Chips Ahoy!® Cookie Topping: Unbleached Enriched Flour (Wheat Flour, Niacin, Reduced Iron, Thiamin Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Semisweet Chocolate Chips (Sugar, Chocolate, Cocoa Butter, Dextrose, Soy Lecithin), Sugar, Soybean Oil, Partially Hydrogenated Cottonseed Oil, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Leavening (Baking Soda and/or Ammonium Phosphate), Salt, Whey (Milk), Natural and Artificial Flavor, Caramel Color.

That’s a lot of ingredients. And plenty of them are just bad. We don’t know many people who think that partially hydrogenated oils and artificial flavors sound like must-have breakfast fare.

We’ll skip this one. It didn’t sound very appealing to begin with and after reading the ingredient list, it actually sounds worse.

http://www.dunkindonuts.com/dunkindonuts/en/menu/food/bakery/donuts/donuts.html?DRP_FLAVOR=Chips+Ahoy%21+Creme+Donut

Subway gets fresher dropping artificial flavors, colors and preservatives by 2017

Subway IngredientsOver the years, we’ve come to associate Subway with its “Eat Fresh” slogan. The chain has always been portrayed as a healthier option, setting itself apart from burgers and chicken sandwiches and french fries. And we all remember Jared Fogle … the “Subway guy” who lost a significant amount of weight eating Subway turkey subs and has kept that weight off almost 20 years later. But even with all that, Subway has always been a fast food chain of sorts, fresher food or not, as evidenced by some of the not-so-healthy ingredients in their foods.

But Subway is also a chain that has listened to its consumers. In early 2014, Subway announced the removal of azodicarbonamide from its breads and rolls. That was a big step and went a long way to justify that “Eat Fresh” slogan.

Now Subway wants you to eat even fresher at its locations.

The sandwich chain told the Associated Press it will remove artificial flavors, colors and preservatives from its menu in North America by 2017. Whether that can help Subway keep up with changing attitudes about what qualifies as healthy remains to be seen.

Elizabeth Stewart, Subway’s director of corporate social responsibility, said in an interview that ingredient improvement has been an ongoing process over the years. More recently, she said the chain has been working on removing caramel color from cold cuts like roast beef and ham. For its turkey, Subway says it plans to replace a preservative called propionic acid with vinegar by the end of this year.

Among its toppings, Stewart said Subway is switching to banana peppers colored with turmeric instead of the artificial dye Yellow No. 5. Without providing details, she said the chain is also working on its sauces and cookies.

The purging of artificial ingredients is quickly becoming the norm among major food companies, which are facing pressure from smaller players that tout their offerings as more wholesome.

Subway is facing evolving definitions for what qualifies as healthy, said Darren Tristano, an analyst for Technomic. While older generations looked at nutritional stats like fat and calories, he said younger generations are more concerned about qualities like “local,” ”organic” and “natural.”

“Change has come so fast and rapidly, consumers are just expecting more and more,” Tristano said.

And although Subway markets itself as a fresher option, he noted that people don’t necessarily see it as the healthiest or best product around.

Tony Pace, Subway’s chief marketing officer, noted the chain is already seen as a place for low-fat options, but that it needs to keep up with changing customer attitudes.
“As their expectations go up, we have to meet those expectations,” he said.

Pace said the use of simple ingredients is becoming a “necessary condition” to satisfy customers, but that it won’t be enough on its own to drive up sales.

Subway is continuing to listen to the voices of its consumers. FoodFacts.com is confident that those consumers will appreciate their efforts to improve the quality and healthfulness of the foods they serve. Every food manufacturer, fast food chain and fast casual chain needs to remember the old adage, “the customer is always right,” and act accordingly.

http://nypost.com/2015/06/04/eat-fresher-subway-drops-artificial-ingredients/

Big news from Taco Bell and Pizza Hut: Artificial colors and flavors on the way out

Taco Bell, Pizza HutFoodFacts.com is committed to recognizing the efforts of food manufacturers, fast food chains and fast casual restaurants responding to consumer demands for better quality food choices. So these announcements from both Taco Bell and Pizza Hut are the subject of today’s blog.

Taco Bell and Pizza Hut say they’re getting rid of artificial colors and flavors, making them the latest big food companies scrambling to distance themselves from ingredients people might find unappetizing.

Instead of “black pepper flavor,” for instance, Taco Bell will start using actual black pepper in its seasoned beef, says Liz Matthews, the chain’s chief food innovation officer.

The Mexican-style chain also says the artificial dye Yellow No. 6 will be removed from its nacho cheese, Blue No. 1 will be removed from its avocado ranch dressing and carmine, a bright pigment, will be removed from its red tortilla strips.

Matthews said some of the new recipes are being tested in select markets and should be in stores nationally by the end of the year.

The country’s biggest food makers are facing pressure from smaller rivals that position themselves as more wholesome alternatives. Chipotle in particular has found success in marketing itself as an antidote to traditional fast food, although some question the meaningfulness of some of its claims. In April, Chipotle announced it had removed genetically modified organisms from its food, even though the Food and Drug Administration says GMOs are safe.

Critics say the purging of chemicals is a response to unfounded fears over ingredients, but companies are nevertheless rushing to ensure their recipes don’t become marketing disadvantages. In recent months, restaurant chains including Panera, McDonald’s and Subway have said they’re switching to ingredients people can easily recognize.

John Coupland, a professor of food science at Penn State University, said companies are realizing some ingredients may not be worth the potential harm they might cause to their images, given changing attitudes about additives.

Additionally, he noted that the removal of artificial ingredients can be a way for companies to give their food a healthy glow without making meaningful changes to their nutritional profiles. For instance, Coupland said reducing salt, sugar or portion sizes would have a far bigger impact on public health.

Taco Bell and Pizza Hut are owned by Yum Brands Inc., which had hinted the changes would be on the way. At a conference for investors late last year, Yum CEO Greg Creed referred to the shifting attitudes and the desire for “real food” as a revolution in the industry.

Representatives at KFC and Yum’s corporate headquarters in Louisville, Kentucky were not immediately available to comment on whether the fried chicken chain would also be removing artificial ingredients.

Pizza Hut says it will remove artificial colors and preservatives by the end of July.

Taco Bell says it will take out artificial colors, artificial flavors, high-fructose corn syrup and unsustainable palm oil from its food by the end of 2015. It says artificial preservatives will be removed “where possible” by 2017. The moves do not affect fountain drinks or co-branded products, such as its Doritos-flavored taco shells.

Brian Niccol, the chain’s CEO, said price increases are based on a variety of factors, and that the company would work to keep its menu affordable.

“I do not want to lose any element of being accessible to the masses,” Niccol said.

When asked whether the changes would affect taste, a representative for Taco Bell said in an email that “It will be the same great tasting Taco Bell that people love.”

While we do think both chains have a long way to go in terms of the ingredients they are using in their foods, this is certainly a step in the right direction. We’ll be curious to examine ingredient lists once these changes have gone into effect. Thanks to the stated time lines, we shouldn’t have to wait too long to take a fresh look.

Every food manufacturer, fast food giant and fast casual restaurant needs to take a good long look at their ingredient lists and LISTEN to the consumers who are making their voices clearly heard. Taco Bell and Pizza Hut are following the voices of those that mean success for their brands. It’s the smart thing to do. Let’s see who’s next to react to the wake-up call.

http://krqe.com/2015/05/30/taco-bell-pizza-hut-artificial-ingredients-getting-booted/

The latest from Wendy’s … the Jalapeno Fresco Spicy Chicken Sandwich

unnamedWendy’s continues to spice up fast food offerings with the Jalapeno Fresco Spicy Chicken Sandwich. If you check out their website, you’ll find this description: “We’re kicking up the heat with 5 layers of spice on our new Jalapeño Fresco Spicy Chicken sandwich. It’s our classic spicy chicken breast topped with fresh, diced jalapeños, ghost pepper sauce, Colby pepper jack cheese all on a red jalapeno bun. It’s too hot to last, so try one today!”

Sounds interesting, but we’ve already seen that “ghost pepper sauce” on their french fries. It was light on the ghost peppers (thankfully) and heavy on the controversial ingredients. We’re also concerned about the spicy chicken breast and the red jalapeno bun for the same reasons. Let’s investigate and see what we can find.

Nutrition Facts:

Calories:                                    580
Fat:                                             30 grams
Saturated Fat:                          9 grams
Sodium:                                    1380 mg

Right away we can see that this chicken sandwich is no healthier than eating a hamburger. So if you’re thinking that chicken is always a healthier option, think again. Most fast food chicken sandwiches aren’t healthier. The ingredients will tell us why.

Colby Pepper Jack Cheese: Colby Cheese (pasteurized milk, cheese culture, salt, enzymes, annatto [vegetable color]), Monterey Jack Cheese With Hot Peppers (pasteurized milk, jalapeno peppers [jalapeno peppers, salt, acetic acid, calcium chloride]. cheese culture, habenero peppers, salt, enzymes). CONTAINS: MILK. Spicy Chicken Breast: Chicken Breast, Water, Seasoning (salt, spice, sodium phosphate [sodium trypolyphosphates, sodium polyphosphates], modified corn starch, paprika, spice extractives, extractives of paprika, and extractives of turmeric). Breaded With: Wheat Flour, Water, Modified Corn Starch, Salt, Bleached Wheat Flour, Wheat Gluten, Spice, Gum Arabic, Egg White Solids, Yellow Corn Flour, Spice Extractives, Leavening (sodium acid pyrophosphates, sodium bicarbonate, monocalcium phosphate), Extractives Of Paprika. Cooked in Vegetable Oil (soybean oil, corn oil, cottonseed oil, hydrogenated soybean oil, citric acid [preservative], dimethylpolysiloxane [anti-foaming agent]). Cooked in the same oil as menu items that contain Fish (where available). CONTAINS: EGG, WHEAT. Cheddar Cheese Sauce: Water, Cheddar Cheese (pasteurized milk, cheese culture, salt, enzymes), Milk Ingredients, Cream Cheese (pasteurized milk and cream, cheese culture, salt, carob bean gum), Modified Cornstarch, Soybean Oil, Palm Oil, Whey, Sodium Phosphate, Cream, Cheese Culture, Milk Fat, Parmesan Cheese (pasteurized part-skim milk, cheese cultures, salt, enzyme), Butter, Sodium Phosphate, Salt And Sea Salt, Sodium Alginate, Carob Bean Gum, Mono & Diglycerides, Annatto And Apocarotenal (for color), Lactic Acid. CONTAINS: MILK. Ghost Pepper Sauce: Soybean Oil, Sour Cream (cream, modified corn starch, lactic acid, gelatin, guar gum, mono and diglycerides, sodium phosphate, sodium benzoate and potassium sorbate [preservatives], acetic acid, citric acid, phosphoric acid, natural and artificial flavors), Buttermilk, Jalapeno Pepper, Egg Yolk, Salt, Water, Distilled Vinegar, Cilantro, Sugar, Spice, Xanthan Gum, Onion (dehydrated), Oleoresin Paprika, Garlic (dehydrated), Acetic Acid, Ghost Pepper, Natural Flavor, Citric Acid, Oleoresin Rosemary. CONTAINS: EGG, MILK. Red Onion Diced Jalapenos Jalapeno Cheddar Bun: Enriched Wheat Flour (wheat flour, malted barley flour, niacin, iron, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), Water, Sugar, Yeast, Palm Oil, Ground Jalapenos, Jalapeno Peppers, Dough Conditioner (wheat flour, diacetyl tartaric acid esters of mono-diglycerides [DATEM], contains 2% or less of: soybean oil, ascorbic acid, enzymes [wheat], l. cysteine hydrochloride), Salt, Cheddar Cheese (pasteurized milk, cheese culture, salt, enzymes, annatto, cellulose [anti-caking agent]), Dry Malt, Calcium Propionate, Dough Conditioner (degermed yellow corn flour, turmeric and paprika [color], contains 2% or less of: natural flavor), Wheat Gluten, Dough Conditioner (calcium sulfate, wheat starch, wheat flour, contains 2% or less of: enzymes [wheat], salt), Butter Flavor (corn maltodextrin, medium chain triglycerides, gum arabic, natural flavors), Shine Agent (modified starch, sodium alginate, mono-diglycerides, soy lecithin, polysorbate 60). CONTAINS: WHEAT, SOY, MILK.

Take a look at the length of that ingredient list! The longer the list, the greater the likelihood of controversial items. And that’s certainly true here. The bun alone is enough to put us off from this sandwich. Makes you wonder if they’re using test tubes to measure the ingredients out instead of kitchen equipment. Consider this: if you’re baking rolls at home and you’d like them to be “shiny,” you’re likely brushing the tops with beaten eggs prior to baking. At Wendy’s, they’re using a “shine agent” that includes polysorbate 60 to emulsify the solution.

FoodFacts.com isn’t a fan of fast food using “solutions” to glaze baked goods. We’re also not a fan of a large number of the ingredients used to create this chicken sandwich. Sorry Wendy’s, we’ll find a way to spice up our meals without the Jalapeno Fresco Spicy Chicken Sandwich.

https://www.wendys.com/en-us/nutrition-info#nutrition_zone_1

The new limited edition Steakhouse Sirloin Third Pound Burger from McDonald’s

h-mcdonalds-Steakhouse-Sirloin-Third-Pound-BurgerWhile McDonald’s continues to struggle to find its way in a world that is becoming increasingly detached from fast food, the most famous chain on the planet continues to attempt new introductions to regain the loyalty of its consumer base.

The unfortunate truth for McDonald’s is that many consumers are turning away from fast food because the message of terrible nutrition facts and horrible ingredient lists is finally hitting home. People are looking for better food.

So when McDonald’s releases new menu items, we’d have to think they’d be keeping this in mind. One of their latest, the Artisan Grilled Chicken Sandwich was definitely a step in the right direction for the chain.

The new Steakhouse Sirloin Third Pound Burger, however, is NOT in keeping with current consumer demand. Let’s take a look at what’s going on with this limited edition menu selection.

Nutrition Facts:

Calories:                            730
Fat:                                     36 grams
Trans Fat:                          2 grams
Saturated Fat:                  16 grams
Sodium:                            1560 mg

And just think — we haven’t even added the fries yet!

What about the ingredients?

THIRD POUND* 100% SIRLOIN BEEF PATTY: 100% Pure USDA Inspected Sirloin Beef; No Fillers, No Extenders. Seasoned with Salt, Sugar, Onion Powder, Natural (Animal and Plant Source) and Artificial Flavors, Spice, Maltodextrin, Autolyzed Yeast Extract, Dried Beef Broth, Dextrose, Garlic Powder, Worcestershire Sauce Powder (Distilled Vinegar, Molasses, Corn Syrup, Salt, Caramel Color, Garlic Powder, Sugar, Spices, Tamarind, Natural Flavor [Plant Source]), Spice Extractives, Beef Fat, Caramel Color, Annatto and Turmeric (Color). PREMIUM BUN: Ingredients: Enriched Flour (Bleached Wheat Flour, Malted Barley Flour, Niacin, Reduced Iron, Thiamin Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Yeast, Barley Malt Extract, Soybean Oil, Salt, Wheat Gluten, Contains 2% Or Less: Soybean Oil, Calcium Sulfate, Ammonium Sulfate, Yellow Corn Flour, Dough Conditioners (Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate, DATEM, Ascorbic Acid, Azodicarbonamide, Distilled Monoglycerides, Monocalcium Phosphate, Enzymes, Calcium Peroxide), Turmeric, Annatto and Paprika Extracts (Color), Natural (Plant Source) and Artificial Flavors, Caramel Color, Calcium Propionate (Preservative), Sesame Seed.
CONTAINS: WHEAT, PASTEURIZED PROCESS WHITE CHEDDAR CHEESE:
Ingredients: Milk, Water, Cheese Culture, Cream, Sodium Citrate, Contains 2% or less of: Salt, Citric Acid, Sorbic Acid (Preservative), May Contain One or More of: Sodium Phosphate, Sodium Pyrophosphate, Sodium Hexametaphosphate, Enzymes, Acetic Acid, Soy Lecithin (Added for Slice Separation). CONTAINS: MILK AND SOY LECITHIN CARAMELIZED GRILLED ONIONS: Ingredients: Slivered Onions Prepared in Onion Reduction Sauce (Palm, Soybean and/or Cottonseed Oil, Salt, Sugar, Caramelized Sugar, Onion Powder, Maltodextrin, Natural Flavors [Plant Source], Spice). COOKED MUSHROOMS, Ingredients: Mushrooms. Prepared with Liquid Margarine (Liquid Soybean Oil and Hydrogenated Cottonseed and Soybean Oils, Water, Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Salt, Soy Lecithin, Mono-and Diglycerides, Sodium Benzoate and Potassium Sorbate [Preservatives], Artificial Flavor, Citric Acid, Vitamin A Palmitate, Beta Carotene [Color]). CONTAINS: SOY LECITHIN CREAMY PEPPERCORN SAUCE:
Ingredients: Water, Sweet Cream Solids, Balsamic Vinegar (Wine Vinegar, Grape Must, Caramel Color), Ribeye Base (Cooked Beef Ribeye, Beef Juices, Sea Salt, Yeast Extract, Natural Flavor [Plant Source], Canola Oil, Potato Flour, Beef Fat), Distilled Vinegar, Corn Starch, Worcestershire Sauce (Distilled Vinegar, Molasses, Corn Syrup, Water, Salt, Caramel Color, Garlic Powder, Sugar, Spices, Tamarind, Natural Flavor [Plant Source]), Contains 2% or Less: Peppercorns (Black, Green and Pink), Sugar, Sea Salt, Spices, Soybean Oil, Soy Sauce (Soybeans, Wheat, Salt), Sodium Benzoate and Potassium Sorbate (Preservatives), Xanthan Gum. CONTAINS: WHEAT, MILK, SOY

FoodFacts.com thinks it’s important to point out that, in fact, that burger McDonald’s is using is actual beef without fillers and extenders. It’s actually the way they’re “seasoning” the burger that creates the problem. We could also point out that they’re using actual mushrooms. Then take a look at that “liquid margarine” they’re using to prepare them. We won’t even go near the “creamy peppercorn sauce.”

McDonald’s can talk about transparency all they want. Sure, they’re using 100% beef burgers and yes they’re using actual mushrooms. But they aren’t being transparent enough to tell us that how they’re preparing those ingredients involves truly terrible ingredients. It’s really only selective transparency.

The new Steakhouse Sirloin Third Pound Burger is not the change consumers are looking for from fast food. Not even close.

http://www.mcdonalds.com/us/en/food/product_nutrition.burgerssandwiches.3024.steakhouse-sirloin-third-pound-burger.html

Real progress: Panera Bread commits to removing over 150 controversial ingredients by 2016

635660908535487026-XXX-CEO-Profile-Panera-Ron-Shaich-2Panera Bread just made everyone at FoodFacts.com happier than we’ve ever been about fast casual dining. They’ve committed to the removal of over 150 controversial ingredients from their menu items by 2016.

We’ve been saying the same thing over and over, every time a fast food or fast casual chain commits to using antibiotic-free chicken, or the removal of a single ingredient due to consumer demand. It’s nice, but just one thing isn’t going to change the perception of an increasingly health-conscious consumer. It has to be bigger than that.

Panera Bread got the real message and they’re doing something about it.

Last week the chain began using only “clean” salad dressings — dressings free from artificial sweeteners, colors, flavors and preservatives. That’s already great news, but it’s much bigger than that. The list of ingredients slated for removal could come directly from the FoodFacts.com controversial ingredient list. You can find the full list here: https://www.panerabread.com/panerabread/documents/panera-no-no-list-05-2015.pdf.

Among the real standouts for us are the removal of aspartame, artificial colors, artificial flavors, caramel color, high fructose corn syrup, partially hydrogenated oils and propylene glycol from their foods. The list goes on though and you should really check it out.

This is a stunning move by Panera Bread and one that challenges every other fast casual and fast food chain. If Panera Bread can find a way to remove just about every ingredient we want to avoid from their menu (we don’t see natural flavor and carrageenan on their list), it’s really impossible to imagine that other chains can’t accomplish the same thing while still offering food that’s appealing and affordable to their consumers.

With this statement, Panera Bread proves that no chain has an excuse. It’s time for the rest of the fast casual and fast food giants to follow their lead.

https://www.panerabread.com/panerabread/documents/panera-no-no-list-05-2015.pdf
http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2015/05/04/panera-panera-bread-fast-food-restaurants-dining-artificial-additives/26696823/

Getting controversial ingredients out of our food: Dunkin’ Donuts to stop using whitening agent

Dunkin Donuts To Stop Use of Titanium DioxideWe’re all about cheering on food manufacturers removing controversial ingredients from their offerings. Listening to the consumers who make them profitable is key to retaining their trust and loyalty in competitive market. It’s also their responsibility to take action as we become educated on the effects of those ingredients on our health and well being.

As much as FoodFacts.com wants to challenge those manufacturers and fast food establishments on the use of controversial ingredients, we also want to give credit where it’s due when one of them commits to the removal of an ingredient in their products. Score one more for team better food!

Dunkin’ Donuts, under pressure from an activist group, has agreed to phase out a controversial whitening agent used in the powdered sugar atop some of its doughnuts.

The move wasn’t announced by the doughnut kingpin, but by the advocacy group As You Sow. The group had submitted a shareholder request asking Dunkin’ Brands to reduce the use of titanium dioxide in its powdered sugar. As You Sow officials claim that titanium dioxide is a “nanomaterial” — a substance engineered to have extremely small dimensions, which the advocacy group claims can be toxic to humans.

In a statement, Dunkin’ Brands chief communications officer Karen Raskopf said that the titanium dioxide is not a “nanoparticle” under the Food and Drug Adminstration’s definition, but that Dunkin’ had still agreed to stop using it.

“The ingredient used in our powdered doughnuts does not meet the definition of ‘nanoparticle’ as outlined under FDA guidance,” Raskopf said. “Nevertheless, we began testing alternative formulations for this product in 2014, and we are in the process of rolling out a solution to the system that does not contain titanium dioxide.”

In a second statement, Raskopf said the move was relevant to investors. “Dunkin’ Brands understands that investors are increasingly interested in the sustainability of the companies in which they invest. As part of our ongoing stakeholder engagement process, we recognize the importance of engaging in productive, ongoing dialogues with our investors to understand and address their concerns, as appropriate.”

The move comes at a time when consumers and activist groups are paying closer attention to the ingredients big food makers and sellers from McDonald’s to Subway put in their foods. Last year, Subway agreed to remove a controversial chemical called azodicarbonamide from its bread shortly after one nutritional activist noted the same chemical is used in yoga mats.

As a result of Dunkin’s announcement, As You Sow withdrew the shareholder proposal.

“This is a groundbreaking decision,” said Danielle Fugere, president of As You Sow. “Dunkin’ has demonstrated strong industry leadership by removing this potentially harmful ingredient from its doughnuts.”

We’re pleased to see Dunkin Donuts responding positively to the efforts of As You Sow. FoodFacts.com believes in the power of this trend and is encouraged by the power of action. Moves like this from Dunkin will move another fast food giant to make changes. We’re getting there … one change at a time.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2015/03/06/dunkin-donuts-fast-food-restaurant-food-safety/24524875/

Almost half of all energy drink ads featured on TV channels popular with teens

energy-drink-can-and-lightningFoodFacts.com reports often on energy drinks. We find these beverages especially concerning because of the countless instances where energy drinks have been linked to hospitalization and death. We’re particularly disturbed by the popularity of the drinks among the teenage population. We’ve heard claims from manufacturers time after time stating that their products aren’t meant for teenagers and that they do not target kids with their marketing campaigns. Hmmmm ….

A study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior has reported that 46% of energy drink advertisements broadcast on television are aired on channels featuring content and themes likely to appeal to teenagers.

Researchers from Dartmouth College, NH, arrived at their findings after examining a database of television advertisements broadcast from March 2012 to February 2013. During this period, across 139 network and cable channels, over 608 hours of energy drinks advertisements were aired.

“Although our results do not support the idea that manufacturers intentionally target adolescents with their advertising, ads for energy drinks were primarily aired on channels with themes likely to appeal to adolescents, and adolescents are likely exposed to energy drink advertising via television,” says lead researcher Jennifer A. Emond.

Energy drinks are beverages containing caffeine and commonly a mixture of other stimulants and energy-giving ingredients. Caffeine content can vary, with concentrations in popular brands ranging from 70 mg per 8 oz serving to 200 mg per 16 oz serving. These amounts are far higher than the average caffeine content of popular soft drinks, which range from 23 to 69 mg per 12 oz.

While the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) generally recognize energy drinks as safe, some experts are concerned about the potential health risks that adolescents can face due to high caffeine intake. Certain adverse health effects are associated with consuming too much caffeine, such as anxiety, sleep disruption and serious cardiovascular events.

At present, the American Academy of Pediatrics advise against energy drink consumption among adolescents, and the American Medical Association registered their support for a ban on the marketing of energy drinks to adolescents alongside the US Senate Commerce Committee in 2013.

Television is highly-watched by adolescents in the US, and the authors of the study describe it as a highly relevant medium for advertising to reach the youth of the nation. Until now, however, little quantitative research has been carried out to investigate the prevalence of energy drink promotion on US television.

The primary target audience of each of the television channels was identified through analyzing audience demographic data from a cable advertising trade group. The researchers identified the 10 television channels that dedicated the most time to energy drink advertising and of these, six included adolescents in their primary target audience.

The six channels were MTV2, ESPN News, FUSE, MTV, ESPN-2 and Black Entertainment Television. MTV2 was identified as the top network and was found by the researchers to have aired 2,959 minutes of energy drink advertisements – around 8.1% of all airtime given to energy drink advertisements.

The proportion of MTV’2 base audience made up of 12-17-year-olds was also found to be 398% greater than that of the average network audience for US television.

“While policies related to energy drink marketing are debated, nutrition educators may wish to include elements of media literacy when advising adolescents and their families about the risks of energy drink consumption,” the authors suggest.

Although it cannot be proven that adolescents specifically viewed these advertisements, Nielsen data have previously indicated that adolescents view more energy drink advertisements than adults on many of the 10 channels identified in this study, including the top network MTV2.

While it can be argued that energy drink advertising appears so frequently on the channels mentioned because the products fit best with sports and risk-taking – popular themes on these channels – previous studies have suggested that energy drinks manufacturers specifically target an adolescent market by associating their products with these themes.

One step the authors suggest that parents can take to help reduce their children’s exposure to energy drink marketing is to try and limit the amount of time they spend watching television.

“Measures of increased television exposure among adolescents (television viewing time, number of televisions in the home, and the presence of a television in the bedroom) have been associated with heavier consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages such as soft drinks, sports drinks, and energy drinks,” state the authors.

In October last year, researchers from the World Health Organization (WHO) claimed that increasing consumption of energy drinks could pose a threat to public health.

FoodFacts.com has some experience with the world of advertising and we’re pretty sure that TV stations that cater to teens are getting more energy drink advertising specifically BECAUSE they’re catering to teens. Demographics are the biggest factor in selecting TV stations for advertisers. The “Popular Themes” on MTV2 of sports and “risk-taking” are in themselves aimed at teens.

Energy drink manufacturers market to teenagers. They do it purposefully. If the teenaged consumer wasn’t important to energy drink sales, their commercials wouldn’t be airing on stations with a predominantly teen demographic.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/290452.php