Category Archives: Artificial Preservatives

Ice cream that doesn’t melt, courtesy of Wal-Mart’s Great Value brand

Wal-Mart-Magic-665x385There are certain things in the world we take for granted. The sun rises in the morning and sets in the evening. Summer is baseball season. Leaves turn color in the fall. Fourth of July brings fireworks shows. And ice cream melts.

Oops, we better cross that last one off the list.

Just over a week ago, a concerned mother in Ohio made big news of the fact that Wal-Mart’s Great Value ice cream sandwiches lack the ability to do what all the others can: melt.

Christie Watson just told WCPO in Cincinnati that her son recently left one of the unwrapped Wal-Mart sandwiches outside in 80 degree F heat for 12 hours and it hadn’t melted.

“I thought that’s quite weird,” she said. “So I looked at the box, and it doesn’t say artificial ice cream. It says ice cream.”

The same thing happened to another sandwich that Watson then left out overnight. She said, “Monday I came out and looked at it, and there was still ice cream there. So I thought to myself: What am I feeding to my children?”

So WCPO, as broadcasters are wont to do, performed its own more extensive experiment, leaving one of the Wal-Mart ice cream sandwiches out in the sun for a few hours, along with a Klondike bar and a pint of Haagen-Dazs.

Not surprisingly, reported the station, “The Wal-Mart sandwich [shown above], though it melted a bit, remained the most solid in appearance, and still looked like a sandwich.”

The others melted away. that might be because the others don’t contain the additives that Wal-Mart’s ice cream sandwich do.

According to a cursory look at Wal-Mart’s website, Great Value sandwiches contain just sugar, milk, cream, buttermilk, whey and corn syrup. But Wal-Mart’s product also contains “1 percent or less of mono- and diglycerides, vanilla extract, guar gum, calcium sulfate, carob bean gum, cellulose gum, carrageenan, artificial flavor and annatto for color.”

Just like the no-drip ice cream that Cold Stone Creamery introduced in 2009, Wal-Mart’s sandwiches make use of a modified food starch that makes their ice cream more like pudding.

“The modified food starch that sets instant pudding caused the resulting blend to gel rather than liquefy,” New York Magazine reported about Cold Stone’s product.

Wal-Mart wasn’t very forthcoming about the additives though. It released the following statement that totally avoided the subject:

“Ice cream melts based on the ingredients including cream. Ice cream with more cream will generally melt at a slower rate, which is the case with our Great Value ice cream sandwiches. In the frozen aisles, Great Value ice cream sandwiches are one of the top sellers, and we are glad to be able to offer a great treat that families love.”

What Wal-Mart is trying to say that their ice cream contains more cream than, Haagen Dazs. This isn’t very likely since Haagen Dazs vanilla ice cream contains just five ingredients: Cream, Milk Nonfat, Sugar, Eggs Yolks, Vanilla Natural. Great Value Ice Cream Sandwiches (also containing vanilla ice cream) contain 51 ingredients. That’s right — 51. Here’s the list from the FoodFacts.com site:

Ice Cream: Milk, Cream, Sugar, Corn Syrup,Buttermilk, Whey, Mono and Diglycerides, Guar Gum,Calcium Sulphate, Carob Bean Gum, Polysorbate 65,Carrageenan, Flavors Natural, Annatto, Ice Cream,Milk, Cream, Sugar, Corn Syrup, Buttermilk, Whey,Mono and Diglycerides, Guar Gum, Calcium Sulphate,Carob Bean Gum, Polysorbate 65, Annatto, Added For Color, Baking Soda, Caramel Color, Carrageenan,Cocoa, Corn Syrup, Cottonseed Oil Partially Hydrogenated, ), Soybeans Oil Partially Hydrogenated, Salt, Soy Lecithin, Sugar, Vegetables Shortening, (, Corn Flour Yellow, Mono and Diglycerides, Flavors Natural, Chocolate Wafer, :, Corn Sugar, Corn Starch Modified, Flour Unenriched Bleached

We’re pretty positive that the reason the Great Value ice cream sandwiches don’t melt has absolutely nothing to do with the idea that they contain more cream. Oh — and we also don’t want to eat ice cream with 51 ingredients.

Nope, in our world, we want the fact that ice cream melts to remain on the list of things we take for granted that will never, ever change. We also don’t want to have to repeat Christie Watson’s question, “What am I feeding my kids?” and come up with an answer that’s 51 ingredients long.

http://www.inquisitr.com/1375965/wal-marts-magical-ice-cream-sandwich-just-try-and-melt-me/

Panera Bread jumps on the healthier food bandwagon committing to remove artificial ingredients by 2016!

Panera Bread to Remove Artificial IngredientsGreat news for Panera Bread fans: the popular fast casual chain is the latest to take a big step towards healthier menu offerings. It has announced that by 2016, artificial additives will be removed from its menu including major ingredients like artificial colors, sweeteners, flavors and preservatives.

“We believe simpler is better,” Scott Davis, chief concept officer said in a news release. “Panera is on a mission to help fix a broken food system. We have a long journey ahead, but we’re working closely with the nutrition community, industry experts, farmers, suppliers and others to make a difference.”

Panera will be taking artificial colors out of its roast beef, maltodextrin and potassium lactate will be removed from the citrus pepper chicken, and horseradish will lose the calcium disodium EDTA.Trans-fats will be removed from the bakery menu items as well.

The announcement is the latest in a string of similar moves from competing fast food chain outlets. Subway recently announced it was removing azodicarbonamide from its bread. The controversial chemical is also found in shoes and yoga mats.

Chick-fil-A also made the announcement that it was cleaning up its menu by reducing ingredients including dyes, HFCS and antibiotics in its popular chicken sandwiches after Vani Hari, the blogger known as “Food Babe” pressured the chain.

And then there’s Chipotle—the poster chain for “healthy” fast food. While Chipotle has been on the clean meat and local produce angle for a while now, it recently made a big step in removing genetically modified ingredients from almost all of its menu items as well as adding vegan sofritos to its offerings.

FoodFacts.com is always happy to hear of another fast food chain making the committment to work towards a cleaner, healthier menu. Panera Bread is an exceptionally popular chain with a solid reputation among consumers. While there menu options have always been thought of as fresher and healthier than many other available options, we’re certainly well aware of the poor ingredients included in so many of Panera’s dishes, tasty as they may be. Kudos to Panera Bread for this commitment. We’re positive that the flavor of their foods will only get better through this effort and that they’ll be gaining even more fans from this bold and necessary move.

This great trend has legs! We can’t wait to see which chain will be the next to make the move towards providing consumers with the healthier foods we all deserve!

http://naturallysavvy.com/eat/move-over-chipotle-panera-bread-is-removing-artificial-ingredients

Important ingredient changes for Kraft singles

There have been plenty of good food news announcements lately. Manufacturers appear to be responding positively to consumer voices are making the kinds of significant changes that may very well change the existing view of brands and manufacturers alike. It’s exciting to see companies actively making the kinds of adjustments to their products that can have real effects on the health and well-being of millions of consumers.

This week, we can add another product from Kraft that the company is scheduling for a healthier make-over: Kraft singles. Cheese products are among those that instantly come to mind when you ask consumers what categories in which they are likely to find unhealthy ingredients. That’s understandable, since that’s how the products are actually referred to – “cheese product,” instead of cheese. Consumers have taken the “heads up” from the term.

But now Kraft says that it is removing artificial preservatives from its most popular Singles cheese product variety. The change will affect Kraft Singles in the full-fat American and White American varieties. According to Kraft, these varieties account for the majority of sales for the brand. Sorbic acid is being replaced by natamycin, which Kraft sys is a “natural mold inhibitor.

While Kraft hasn’t acknowledged that it’s decision is due to a growing number of Americans paying closer attention to what they eat and wanting to know that their foods contain natural ingredients, it’s a good bet that this is what’s motivating the news.

The ingredients used in Kraft Singles, prior to this change have been approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration. But, even so, putting out a product that is free of artificial preservatives is a definite selling point for any manufacturer. Kraft, for example, plans to begin airing TV ads near the end of February touting that its Kraft Singles cheese product “begins with milk” and are now “made with no artificial preservatives.”

The ads show cartoon cows grazing in a pasture, with a milk truck driving past.

The new Kraft packages, which began appearing on supermarket shelves in recent weeks, also come stamped with a red circle noting they have no artificial preservatives or flavors. Kraft says its Singles haven’t used artificial flavors for many years, but that it just recently decided to advertise that aspect of the product.

“Consumers are looking for those less artificial cues and messages,” said Gavin Schmidt, manager of cheese research and development at Kraft. “Those messages are more meaningful to consumers than they have been in the past.”

Schmidt says the change took about five years to perfect because Kraft wanted to ensure the product’s taste and shelf life remained the same. He declined to provide details, but said it wasn’t as simple as swapping out an artificial preservative and replacing it with a natural one.

Schmidt said Kraft is testing the removal of artificial preservatives from its other Kraft Singles varieties, but that it wanted to start with the most popular lines first. The changes do not affect Kraft Singles that are 2 percent milk, fat-free or other full-fat varieties.

Even so, FoodFacts.com wants to acknowledge this move by Kraft Foods to keep their customers happy and provide a healthier, better product. We hope that other manufacturers take note and that this trend continues. While it isn’t likely to happen any decade soon, we’d love to reach the day that artificial ingredients aren’t showing up on ANY ingredient labels for ANY products in our grocery stores. Until that day, we’ll just keep spreading the good food news wherever we find it!

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2014/02/11/kraft-singles-to-lose-artificial-preservative