More incriminating information on BPA

FoodFacts.com is always looking for information for our community regarding controversial food ingredients, but we also keep a close eye out for information on anything controversial affecting our food supply. There’s some new information on BPS that deserves your attention.

Bisphenol-A is a chemical used to make plastics and can lining. It has long raised health concerns in regards to its use in food applications. It’s controversial because it exerts detectable hormone-like properties. BPA is actually a weak endocrine disruptor. It mimics estrogen and has been linked to neurological difficulties in connection with prenatal exposure. Problems with BPA have also been linked to breast cancer, prostate cancer, as well as reproductive and thyroid issues. Canada is the first nation to declare BPA a toxic substance. And recently Europe and the United States have banned its use in baby bottles and sippy cups.

As if the problems BPA is already linked to weren’t enough, we now have a brand new study suggesting that BPA can increase the risk for coronary artery disease. The Metabonomics and Genomics in Coronary Artery Disease study researched the levels of BPA in 951 people suspected of having severe coronary artery disease or a narrowing of the arteries around the heart. They found that BPS levels were higher in those who were actually diagnosed with the disease.

The study’s participants were referred by their doctors to specialists because they exhibited symptoms for coronary artery disease. BPA levels are tested by a simple urine test. Since the chemical is processed quickly by the body, if a person hasn’t been exposed to BPA in a few consecutive days, the urine will be clear of BPA.

Of the 591 people studied, the 385 people diagnosed with severe coronary artery disease had notably higher BPA levels than the participants who did not receive the diagnosis. There were 86 participants who developed coronary artery disease while having no BPA exposure.

While more research is needed, this information is important enough for consumers to limit their use of canned foods, foods packaged in plastics and beverages in plastic bottles. And while the U.S. has banned the use of BPA in baby bottles and sippy cups, young children are still prone to exposure (think plastic water bottles).

FoodFacts.com encourages our community members to be aware of the dangers of BPA and the possible sources of exposure. Keep yourselves and your families safe from this chemical that continually exhibits dangerous effects.  Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/08/16/bpa-may-boost-artery-disease-risk/#ixzz242ieYd9Q