Monthly Archives: March 2011

Lean Cuisine Spaghetti with Meatballs Recalled

Nestle is recalling about 10, 260 pounds of Lean Cuisine Spaghetti with meatballs frozen meals.

Consumers complained that they found pieces of red plastic in the meatballs.

The product has a case code of 0298595519P and its’ UPC code is 13800-10390.

If you have this product at home do not eat it and instead call Nestle Consumer Services at (866) 606-8264 or email leancuisine@casupport.com. Nestle will provide replacement coupons and retrieve the recalled product for examination.

Nestle made this statement regarding the recall:
“Nestle is dedicated to food quality, and the health and safety of its consumers. For these reasons, the company initiated this recall. We apologize to our retail customers and consumers and sincerely regret any inconvenience created by this voluntary product recall.”

This is similar to the Perdue Chicken nugget recall last summer, when they found pieces of plastic in the chicken.

Pet Food RECALL ALERT! Jones Natural Chews Co Recalls Pig Ear Dog Chews

dog-chewing-pig-earJones Natural Chews Co of Rockford, IL is recalling 2705 boxes of Pig Ears because it has the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella. Salmonella can affect animals and there is also risk of it affecting humans as well if they handle the contaminated pet products. People handling dry pet food and/or treats can become infected with Salmonella, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the chews or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

Jones Natural Chews Pig Ears were distributed in CT, IA, IL, MA, ME, MI, MN, MO, MT, NC, ND, NJ, NM, NY, PA,VA, WA, and WI. They were shipped to distributors and retailers between September 15, 2010 and November 2, 2010 where they were available for purchase.

Jones Natural Chews Co Pig Ears 2pk bag with header card–item upc 741956001047 lot 2420

Jones Natural Chews Co Pig Ears bulk 100ct box-box upc 741956001139 lot 2490, 2560, 2630, 2700, 2840, 2910, 2980

Jones Natural Chews Co Pig Ears bulk 50 ct box-box upc 741956001504 lot 2490, 2840

Jones Natural Chews Co Pig Ears bulk 25ct box-box upc 741956001467 lot 2700

Jones Natural Chews Co Pig Ears 1pk shrinkwrapped-item upc 741956001146 lot 2700, 2840, 2420

Jones Natural Chews Co Pig Ears 10pk printed bag-item upc 741956001405 lot 2420, 2560, 2630, 2840

Blain’s Farm & Fleet Pig Ears 10 pieces bag-item upc 741956001405 lot 2560

Country Butcher Dog Chews Pig Ears 1pk shrinkwrapped-item upc 741956001511 lot 2630

Country Butcher Dog Chews Pig Ears 1pk shrinkwrapped-item upc 741956001146 lot 2420

Country Butcher Dog Chews Pig Ears 12pk bag-item upc 741956001245 lot 2910

No illnesses have been reported to date.

The recall was the result of a routine sampling program by Washington State Department of Agriculture which revealed that the finished products contained the bacteria. The company has no product left in inventory from this batch of pig ears.

Consumers who have purchased any of these pig ears are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company at 1-877-481-2663.

http://petsblogs.com/2011/03/jones-natural-chews-co-recalls-pig-ear-dog-chews/

Happy Birthday Starbucks!

Since Starbucks is on our good side right now, thanks to their healthy perfect Oatmeal, we thought we would give them a birthday shout out.
Birthday Pop

So “Happy 40th Birthday Starbucks! Love, Food Facts P.S. We love your Perfect Oatmeal! ”

What’s in it for you?? Well, this Thursday, Friday and Saturday between 2pm-5pm Starbucks will be giving you a free little dessert when you buy a drink! These little desserts, they are calling Starbucks Petites include cake pops, sweet squares and whoopie pies! Why are we giving these yummy but unhealthy treats the ok? Well, each treat is under 200 calories and is little! So just remember one is enough! Rocky Road Pop

If you are on a diet, small little desserts are a great way not to starve yourself of your favorite foods but keep portion size in check. Give yourself a little treat so you won’t over do it on something else!

Which flavor will you all get? We have our eye on the Red Velvet Whoopie Pie!
Red Velvet Whoopie Pie

Do you eat in your sleep?

woman-eating-asleep-200

For Leslie, it all started around menopause: the fatigue, the weight gain and the eating in the middle of the night. Sometimes she would have absolutely no memory of getting up to eat, but would find a mess in the kitchen. Other times, she would feel half-awake but out of control and compelled to get out of bed and find food.

I had a strong suspicion that Leslie had a parasomnia that we call sleep-related eating disorder. The key features are: 1. Nocturnal eating while asleep or half-asleep and therefore there is no or little recall of the events but there is evidence of eating or there are witnesses. 2. Bizarre and sometimes dangerous things are consumed. 3. Elaborate food preparation often takes place but in a careless, sloppy manner 4. There are often underlying eating disorders and/or a primary sleep disorder. As she continued her story, I became more convinced that indeed Leslie had this disorder.

At first, the episodes occurred perhaps once a week, then it was more frequent and now it was nearly every night. At first, the things that she was eating were pretty normal but rarely very healthy. Carbs, fat and the occasional protein.

She was alarmed by the time that she made a baked potato in the middle of the night. “Do you know how long it takes to bake a potato! It scares me that the episodes last that long and also the reason I know that I baked it in the oven, rather than microwaving it, is because the oven was still on in the morning.”

Then the things that she was eating got a bit bizarre. For example, one time, her husband found her trying to eat a frozen veggie burger. But what brought her to the sleep center was the episode where she found an open, half-eaten can of cat food and she was not sure if she had really fed it to her cat.

As of yet, there is not a lot of research on this disorder. Prevalence rates are estimated to be approximately 4% of young adults which is not an insignificant number. The prevalence rates are even higher among people with eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa.

Typically, people are in their 20s or 30s when they present with this complaint, but the fact that Leslie was in her early 50s and just going through menopause was a clue that she might have an underlying sleep disorder such as obstructive sleep apnea, which often appears or becomes worse when women go through menopause because the loss of estrogen means the muscles in the throat are not as toned as they once were.

Accordingly, the diagnostic workup should include a thorough evaluation for another underlying eating or sleep disorder. An overnight sleep study is usually performed and the person is asked to keep a sleep diary for two to four weeks to document what he or she recalls and what evidence there is of their nocturnal eating.

This disorder should be distinguished from night-eating syndrome, which involves excessive eating between the evening meal and bedtime. This disorder is characterized by complete nocturnal awakenings and fully conscious eating in the middle of the night. No bizarre foods are consumed and the eating behavior/food preparation is not sloppier than usual. In this disorder, it is less likely that the patients have an underlying sleep disorder and more likely that they have longstanding issues with food and weight gain.

That brings us to some of the health consequences of sleep-related eating disorder and night-eating syndrome. People can gain a lot of weight and sometimes over a short period of time. They can develop type 2 diabetes and high cholesterol and it can be difficult to manage these disorders with the usual medications if people are consuming excessive, empty calories in the middle of the night. In sleep-related eating disorder, people can ingest toxic substances. They can also leave the stove on, thereby endangering themselves and their loved ones. Patients can have problems in their relationships because they are waking up their bed partners. Some patients even bring food back to bed, so even if it wouldn’t bother you if your spouse got up every night, few of us would want to wake up to find our spouse in the bed pulling apart a greasy chicken and throwing the carcass under the covers. Finally, patients are very psychologically disturbed by how out of control they feel.

There is not much research on what treatments might help these patients. Of course we treat the underlying eating or sleep disorder. If there is none or that approach does not resolves the symptoms, then we try medications such as topiramate or zonisamide, which are anti-convulsants. Other medications that have been given with some success are dopaminergic agents, benzodiazepines such as Clonazepam and opiates. With Leslie we lucked out; she did indeed have severe sleep apnea and when we treated it all her nocturnal eating stopped.

Lisa Shives, M.D., is the founder of Northshore Sleep Medicine in Evanston, Illinois. She blogs on Tuesdays on The Chart. Read more from her at Dr. Lisa Shives’ Sleep Better Blog.

http://thechart.blogs.cnn.com/2011/03/08/get-some-sleep-do-you-eat-in-your-sleep/

Happy Mardi Gras!

Get the beads out, It’s Fat Tuesday! Although, Foodfacts.com cautions against unhealthy foods, it is ok to indulge every once in awhile. Here’s a video on some of the classic Mardi Gras foods and traditions.

So go ahead, whip up some pancakes or a King Cake! Our friends at Diary of A Sweet Tooth have a great recipe for King Cake, check it out!

Happy Mardi Gras!

The Charlie Sheen Sandwich

Maybe you all are sick of hearing about Charlie Sheen but we have to give the guys over at Dudefoods.com some credit for this innovative “Charlie Sheen” sandwich. Don’t worry there’s no Tiger’s blood in the sandwich and although the creativity might be “winning” the amount of calories probably isn’t.

Recipe:
2 Boneless Chicken Breasts – Cook 1 in Vodka and spices and cook the other in tequila, lime juice and cilantro.
1 Slice of Beer Bread
Smoked Ham
Smoked Turkey
Sharp Cheddar Cheese
2 Sunny Side Up Eggs

What do you think? Is this sandwich a Winner?

Skippy Recall Alert

skippy-peanut-butter

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have announced a limited recall of Skippy Reduced Fat Peanut Butter because it may be contaminated with Salmonella.

Fortunately, unlike previous peanut butter recalls, this peanut butter recall only includes a few products. Specifically, this limited recall only affects Skippy Reduced Fat Creamy Peanut Butter Spread and Skippy Reduced Fat Super Chunk Peanut Butter Spread sold in 16.3 oz plastic jars with:

UPCs: 048001006812 and 048001006782
Best-If-Used-By Dates: MAY1612LR1, MAY1712LR1, MAY1812LR1, MAY1912LR1, MAY2012LR1 and MAY2112LR1
The UPC number is located on the side of the jar’s label below the bar code and the Best-If-Used-By Date is stamped on the lid of the jar. The recalled Skippy peanut butter was sold in Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Wisconsin.

Although no illnesses have been reported from the contaminated peanut butter, consumers should discard recalled peanut butter and get a replacement coupon from Unilever if they have Skippy Reduced Fat Peanut Butter Spread with the above UPCs and Best-If-Used-By-Dates.

Source: http://pediatrics.about.com/b/2011/03/04/skippy-peanut-butter-recall.htm

Author: Vincent Iannelli, M.D.

The Dirty Dozen Produce

pg-diet-nutrition-dirty-dozen-01-full
Eating these non-organic fruits and veggies will leave you exposed to an average of Ten pesticides a day. So try your best to buy organic when shopping for the ‘Dirty Dozen’.

A quick guide to Twelve produce items that are the most exposed to pesticides known as ‘The Dirty Dozen’. Watch here:

If you can afford to buy a few more Organic items, then, these are the next group you want to focus on:
1. Lettuce
2. Blueberries (Imported)
3. Carrots
4. Green Beans (Domestic)
5. Pears
6. Plums (Imported)
7. Summer Squash
8. Cucumbers (Imported)

New research shows that some pesticides used on strawberries, grapes, lettuce and other produce may disrupt male hormones.

But remember, these produce items are still healthy for you and much, much more nutritious than any processed or sugar filled food.

Popular Organic Milk Brand Might Be In Trouble

Horizon Organic Milk is facing criticism after the release of their new “Horizon Fat-Free Milk Plus DHA Omega 3″ product on February 22nd . The bad reviews are stemming from the popular Organic brand (their kid cartons are even at Starbucks) adding the synthetic ingredient DHA oil to their new fat-free milk line.
Horizon Milk
Note: Just this particular product is under fire, the rest of the brand, owned by parent company Dean Foods, seems to maintain it’s good organic reputation.

Organic food watchdog groups such as the Cornucopia Institute, are complaining that if a product has DHA oil in it then, it shouldn’t be considered organic.

Dean Foods’ Horizon spokesman Dr. Alan Greene said “Organic milk fortified with DHA is a great option for families looking to incorporate nutritious products in their diets with the proven benefits of DHA, including those for heart, brain and eye health.”

Charlotte Vallaeys, a farm and food policy analyst with Cornucopia is concerned that DHA’s nutritional benefits haven’t been proven nor has it been reviewed by the National Organic Standards Board “It is therefore absolutely baffling that Dean Foods would introduce a product with synthetic DHA and have the audacity to label it organic, and it’s even more disturbing that their certifier would allow this,”

What do you guys think? Should products with DHA be considered Organic?

McDonald’s Oatmeal

Our previous blog tells how to make Oatmeal the right way, this blog shows how McDonald’s is making Oatmeal the wrong way.

Oatmeal should be made with primarily one ingredient, not twenty one! Sure, at home you can add a little brown sugar, cinnamon, nuts, apples or milk, but you are doing so sparingly and with ingredients that are fresh without chemicals (McDonald’s “cream” has seven ingredients??)

I’m sure McDonald’s knows that once you walk into a McDonald’s you aren’t going to order just Oatmeal, they are just trying to get you in the door.

Has anyone tried the McDonald’s Oatmeal?