Monthly Archives: December 2009

Tryptophan: The Misunderstood Ingredient

The Turkey and Tryptophan Myth | Foodfacts.com

The Turkey and Tryptophan Myth | Foodfacts.com

Well, here we go again. Foodfacts.com has noticed that tryptophan is discussed extensively, especially over the holidays.

Although many people blame the tryptophan in turkey for their post-meal drowsiness, this is not really an accurate connection. Tryptophan is an essential amino acid (which means our bodies can’t make it and we must get it from our diets) and it’s found in many foods, including turkey and other meats, wheat, dairy and more. Continue reading

Children, Autism and Gastro-Intestinal Disorders

Children and Autism | Foodfacts.com

Children and Autism | Foodfacts.com

Foodfacts.com has come across an interesting news item of interest to parents of autistic children concerned about the much-discussed and speculated dietary-nutrition connection. On November 15th, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), North America Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) and Autism Speaks hosted a one day symposium of researchers, clinicians and pediatric specialists to address GI symptoms seen in children with autism spectrum disorders. Continue reading

Helping Kids Eat Healthy

Helping Kids Eat Healthy | Foodfacts.com

Helping Kids Eat Healthy | Foodfacts.com

Lots of families have a common problem. The little ones just don’t want to eat what’s good for them. But kids need the correct amount of nutrition every day, especially during those tender years when their bodies and minds are still growing and developing. Continue reading

Turkey or Chicken Soup With Lemon and Rice

Turkey or Chicken Soup With Lemon and Rice

Turkey or Chicken Soup With Lemon and Rice

A Recipe for Health

Foodfacts.com discovered a comforting soup that is inspired by a Middle Eastern chicken soup. It’s great with or without leftover turkey — don’t hesitate to pull turkey stock from the freezer and make it with just vegetables and rice. Continue reading

The Taken For Granted Potato

Potatoes | Foodfacts.com

Potatoes | Foodfacts.com

Our Foodfacts.com research on potatoes revealed an interesting fact: the popularity of the humble potato has waxed and waned with varying degrees of drama over the course of its 2,200-year history. It was revered in ancient Peru, where slices of potato were used to treat broken bones and to prevent rheumatism. Upon introduction to Europe in the 1600s, it was blamed for leprosy and thought to be poisonous (the French listed it as a dangerous aphrodisiac). In Ireland, crop failure due to potato blight was one of the causes of a mass migration to America during the mid-1800s (and of the loss of over a million lives). During the Alaskan Gold Rush, potatoes were so highly valued that they were traded for gold; a hundred years later, the low-carb diet craze caused Americans to shun potatoes in any form. In recent years, potatoes have begun to win back some of their lost honor, to the delight of Hudson Valley farmers, who have always grown them. If there’s anything that history shows, it’s that potatoes have staying power. Continue reading

The Secret of How To Interpret a Food Label

Food Laberl | Foodfacts.com

Food Label | Foodfacts.com

“You need to eat less calories, exercise more and choose healthier foods.” Does this sound familiar? Often times after leaving a doctor’s appointment and being informed about your ever rising cholesterol levels, borderline blood pressure and excessive weight gain, you leave the office with these words of wisdom. It sounds like a great idea but as you start to think about your plan of action, you often wonder what these code words mean. It seems as though you need to figure out how to decipher the code to become successful in obtaining your doctor’s wishes in improving your health, but at the same time you struggle in trying not to lose your sense of satisfaction of fulfillment when nourishing your body. Just how much do you give up to obtain a healthy lifestyle without compromising the joy you experience from eating your favorite foods? Continue reading

Spices might boost women’s health: Study

Spices | Foodfacts.com

Spices | Foodfacts.com

Compounds found in spices may reduce the risk of breast cancer formation by stopping the growth of the stem cells that spawn the tumors, says a new study encountered by blog editors at Foodfacts.com.

Researchers from the University of Michigan report that curcumin, found in turmeric, and piperine, found in black peppers, decreased the number of stem cells while having no effect on normal differentiated cells. Continue reading